ue faire de notre cerveau? Summary ô 102



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  1. says:

    In this incisive essay Catherine Malabou reflects on the implications of a new brain view on our world view The neurosciences are revealing an image of the brain that is far removed from the machine metaphors that have guided our understanding of selfhood for ages Our brain is an evolving network that connects neuronal spaces with multiple and malleable functionalities It is plastic and continues to develop and heal itself throughout our lifespan But these important discoveries do not seem to have affected our shared understanding of ourselves They have not disclosed new ways for living and new ways to be happy In short the neuronal revolution has not liberated us uite the opposite phenomenon seems to be taking place Malabou sees in this new image of the decentralized adaptive brain a template for the neuronal ideology that propels forward contemporary global capitalism Organizations have to become flexible and innovative to survive Old hierarchies are shed to make way for networked forms of self organization For workers this absence of hierarchy and the necessity of being mobile and adaptable are the source of new anxieties The workplace has turned into the antechamber of nervous depression This ideological norm of flexibility steers us toward sickness and has to be resisted Malabou sees the locus of resistance in some sort of brain literacy All of us need to reflect on the uestion What should we do with our brain? This reflection „should allow us to understand why given that the brain is plastic free we are always and everywhere in chains” Malabou’s pedagogic project hinges on the conceptual distinction between plasticity and flexibility The former is situated between two extremes the taking on of form and the annihilation of form Plastic material can be sculpted but it can also detonate From this tension between formation and disappearance of form emerges a new concept of adaptive selfhood By the way there is a striking correspondence between Malabou’s concept of an adaptive selfhood that maintains this homeostasis between forces of formation and annihilation and the identity function in Stafford Beer’s Viable Systems Model With her analysis the author also seeks to critically uestion a naive materialism that sees an uninterrupted causal chain from the neuronal to the mental Because behind this harmonious conception sits a Darwinist stereotype of a successful personality For Malabou the transition from biology to consciousness supposes friction and resistance „there is not simple and limpid continuity from the one to the other but rather transformation of the one into the other out of their mutual conflict Only an ontological explosion could permit the transition from one order to another The neuronal and the mental resist each other and themselves and it is because of this that they can be linked to one another” This image of coherence despite conflict and incommensurability is the cornerstone of a worldview in which true freedom exists This short book is thought provoking and well written Recommended


  2. says:

    This is my first reading of Malabou and I have to say that I was a bit disappointed First of all I feel she caricatures Bergson who I feel would be of an ally to the insights of neuroplasticity than she admits in the book I also don't know what Darwinian neuroscientists she's critiuing in the book but the short gloss she gives of natural selection is also uite superficial To be sure some people interpret natural selection as the best but nuanced interpretations show how it is basically the reaction of biology to the actions of the organism in the environment Her short description of neural connections as either growing or withering based upon which actions were performed would seem to accord with that description Finally I have to say that Malabou's interest in explosion seems uite aligned with the ideology of today It's like we're caught in a binary of just submitting to the demands to be flexible or we cease to be flexible and resist explosively the oppressions that are put upon us But this binary is itself a product of the time we live in She makes a feeble argument that some explosions are not in fact terrorist explosions of rage for example apparently saying that her own appeal to explosiveness isn't embedded in the same logic But that seems disingenuous I loved Malabou's argument that plasticity involves something than flexibility and to misrecognize this means that we simply submit to the ideology of precarious labor I find that to add a political dimension to other books in the philosophy of mind those of Francisco Varela and Andy Clark Yet I have to say that I find Varela Clark and Evan Thompson's analysis of the actual neurobiology to be detailed nuanced and compelling Perhaps her other books are better


  3. says:

    As the author writes This book is for everyone and this uestion is for everyone too She provocatively shows how the neuroscience fails to explains the transmission from signal to meaning despite all its developments We still don't know how a singular self is constituted out of a universal self with transmission of synapses Pointing to how these sciences neglect plasticity in the sense that it can not only receive form it can also give form But what about the annihilation of all forms? what about resilience to take form? Elasticity or bending is what is mainly talked about not only in brain functioning but also in Education I can't stop thinking of education in terms of forming and how we educators forget the explosive plasticity What we mean by Bildung is mostly to form oneself as opposed to say no to all formsShe instead suggests an ontological explosion that allows transmission to a different order From time to time we should allow ourselves to explodewhat I mostly like is the chapter on the brain where she demonstrates the language of neuroscience is not actually neutral rather it reflects the political dominance of the society we are living in The brain works as a network as much as the companies and corporations do


  4. says:

    I managed to finish Malabou's book while on a plane flight from Europe to the United States It's short but pithy Her main point is to explain three versions of the concept of plasticity and also to show how the debate over reductionism and anti reductionism really misses the point She goes over some of the latest science on the brain and consciousness She wants to show that the metaphor of the brain as a computer machine or internet hub is inadeuate to the task of accurately capturing how consciousness functions and that plasticity is a much better way to think of the brain


  5. says:

    A brilliant take on the plasticity of the brain and how the ability of our brains to receive form but also to structure form can lead to a dialectic of constancy v creation Within this resistance is needed to provoke the power of developing forces A great read especially for anyone who has read Ravaisson's Of Habit as it gives a scientific explanation as to how some of his ideas could manifest themselves


  6. says:

    Astonishing provocative book about our contemporary neoliberal? era


  7. says:

    the formation of each identity is a kind of resilience in other words a kind of contradictory construction and effacement of forms In excluding all negativity from their discourse in chasing away every conflictual consideration on the transition from the neuronal to the mental certain neuroscientists cannot most of the time escape the confines of a well meaning conception of successful personality harmless and mature But we have no use for harmony and maturity if they only serve to make us 'scrappers' or 'prodigal elders' Creating resistance to neuronal ideology is what our brain wants and what we want for itI'm awfully afraid to write this as any form of my own interpretation will come from a place far from the world of neuroscience but Malabou is certainly doing philosophy here Personality identity and even language seem to form after these synaptic explosions The polymorphic neurological deus ex machina of sorts Malabou would HATE that I wrote that of plasticity reforms the brain with the new information connecting the strands of information and ideas together into one This is why our first memory is often a trauma this is the first explosion that takes place in the brain that sends the synapses a sparkin' From there plasticity makes up for the damage and collects everything new that the brain has to deal with ie the trauma and integrates it into one whole identity In a way its like identity is just our brains compensating for us all sustaining damage and we're all running around trying to make up for it Its like that Shel Silverstein book about the missing pieceThis book is pretty righteous too with Malabou inserting a lot of right on socio political takes She also thank god debunks the bullshit the brain is like a computertelephone systeminternet metaphor This kind of technomorphism only serves the purposes of our fucking bosses to make us better workersThere was clearly a lot Malabou wanted to say that she chose not to and I'm very interested in finding out what she left out in the future


  8. says:

    Malabou writes clearly as she engages with the topic of how the brain should be thought She argues against older models of various information networks and instead develops an intriguing model of plasticity to explain brain functioning A good introduction to her work style


  9. says:

    malabou brought forth to the table a lot of interesting concepts my absolute favorite parts are when she’s talking about capitalism relating her ideas of brain plasticity the very nature of our brain as something that goes against our current status uo something that goes against the culture of docility we have been imposed i love how she talks about the brain as the product of biology but also culture and history these parts i felt like i understood her perfectly and we were in good sync nevertheless there was a section when she was talking about the “translation” of neuronal to mental that completely lost me that was about from pages 60 70ish even though that idea is so interesting and i wanna know so badlyanyway the thesis of the book very interesting i’m gonna make a doc with a summary for each section and comments to ensure i’ve truly understood since this whole plasticity idea is a very important tenant of neuroscience being a person in general also like even though most of the research neuroscience has achieved is pretty new and hard to relate to ourselves meaning that it doesn’t have a lot of social impact and most of the one that does is pretty fake anyway it is still very very important to further this research and general understanding of the brain and how it affectscreates us personally i really loved one sentence where malabou says that she’s not afraid of or in disagreement with the materialistic pov that “we are our synapses” and i think that there’s an idea that to think that is very reductionist but i think i’m also starting to not be afraid of such a thought i think i can also fully embrace it and am really inclined to it than any metaphoricaltranscendental stuff idk it’s not an ugly thought the answers to these concepts aren’t simple and they aren’t eitheror uestions either or they shouldn’t be at least malabou uses the word “dialectical” to describe the current brain ideas a lot and i think it’s a perfect word choice because it allows us to expand the way we approach this topic and analyze it the eitheror way of thinking has caused me a lot of difficulties in class and in my investigations so thanks malabou for really driving that point home


  10. says:

    A highly informed and fiercely intelligent philosopher argues for a mediated approach to debate between mindbody and bodybody approaches to cognition one which entails a return the still unpleated highwater mark of dialectics GWF Hegel


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Read & download Ý PDF, DOC, TXT, eBook or Kindle ePUB free â Catherine Malabou

Develops a second radical meaning for plasticity Not only does plasticity allow our brains to adapt to existing circumstances it opens a margin of freedom to intervene to change those very circumstances Such an understanding opens up a newly transformative aspect of the neurosciences In insisting on this proximity between the neurosciences and the social sciences Malabou applies to the brain Marx's well known phrase about history people make their own brains but they do not know it This book is a summons to such knowledgeCollection Perspectives in Continental Philosophy malabou brought forth to the table a lot of interesting concepts my absolute favorite parts are when she’s talking about capitalism relating her ideas of brain plasticity the very nature of our brain as something that goes against our current status uo something that goes against the culture of docility we have been imposed i love how she talks about the brain as the product of biology but also culture and history these parts i felt like i understood her perfectly and we were in good sync nevertheless there was a section when she was talking about the “translation” of neuronal to mental that completely lost me that was about from pages 60 70ish even though that idea is so interesting and i wanna know so badlyanyway the thesis of the book very interesting i’m gonna make a doc with a summary for each section and comments to ensure i’ve truly understood since this whole plasticity idea is a very important tenant of neuroscience being a person in general also like even though most of the research neuroscience has achieved is pretty new and hard to relate to ourselves meaning that it doesn’t have a lot of social impact and most of the one that does is pretty fake anyway it is still very very important to further this research and general understanding of the brain and how it affectscreates us personally i really loved one sentence where malabou says that she’s not afraid of or in disagreement with the materialistic pov that “we are our synapses” and i think that there’s an idea that to think that is very reductionist but i think i’m also starting to not be afraid of such a thought i think i can also fully embrace it and am really inclined to it than any metaphoricaltranscendental stuff idk it’s not an ugly thought the answers to these concepts aren’t simple and they aren’t eitheror uestions either or they shouldn’t be at least malabou uses the word “dialectical” to describe the current brain ideas a lot and i think it’s a perfect word choice because it allows us to expand the way we approach this topic and analyze it the eitheror way of thinking has caused me a lot of difficulties in class and in my investigations so thanks malabou for really driving that point home Idols for Destruction existing circumstances it opens a margin of freedom to intervene to change those very circumstances Such an understanding opens up a newly transformative aspect of the neurosciences In insisting on this proximity between the neurosciences and the social sciences Malabou applies to the brain Marx's well known phrase about history people make their own brains but they do not know it This book is a summons to such knowledgeCollection Perspectives in Continental Philosophy malabou brought forth to the table a lot of interesting concepts my absolute favorite parts are when she’s talking about capitalism relating her ideas of brain plasticity the very nature of our brain as something that goes against our current status uo something that goes against the culture of docility we have been imposed i love how she talks about the brain as the product of biology but also culture and history these parts i felt like i understood her perfectly and we were in good sync nevertheless there was a section when she was talking about the “translation” of neuronal to mental that completely lost me that was about from pages 60 70ish The Daughter of Time (Inspector Alan Grant even though that idea is so interesting and i wanna know so badlyanyway the thesis of the book very interesting i’m gonna make a doc with a summary for Tricky Twenty-Two (Stephanie Plum, each section and comments to The End of the Line ensure i’ve truly understood since this whole plasticity idea is a very important tenant of neuroscience being a person in general also like The Ear Book even though most of the research neuroscience has achieved is pretty new and hard to relate to ourselves meaning that it doesn’t have a lot of social impact and most of the one that does is pretty fake anyway it is still very very important to further this research and general understanding of the brain and how it affectscreates us personally i really loved one sentence where malabou says that she’s not afraid of or in disagreement with the materialistic pov that “we are our synapses” and i think that there’s an idea that to think that is very reductionist but i think i’m also starting to not be afraid of such a thought i think i can also fully Doors Open embrace it and am really inclined to it than any metaphoricaltranscendental stuff idk it’s not an ugly thought the answers to these concepts aren’t simple and they aren’t I Blame The Scapegoats eitheror uestions Beneath the Earth either or they shouldn’t be at least malabou uses the word “dialectical” to describe the current brain ideas a lot and i think it’s a perfect word choice because it allows us to Gagged expand the way we approach this topic and analyze it the Aristocrats eitheror way of thinking has caused me a lot of difficulties in class and in my investigations so thanks malabou for really driving that point home

Read & download ue faire de notre cerveau?

ue faire de notre cerveau?

Recent neuroscience in replacing the old model of the brain as a single centralized source of control has emphasized 'plasticity' the uality by which our brains develop and change throughout the course of our lives Our brains exist as historical products developing in interaction with themselves and with their surroundings Hence there is a thin line between the organization of the nervous system and the political and social organization that both conditions and is conditioned by human experience Looking carefully at contemporary neuroscience it is hard not to notice tha This is my first reading of Malabou and I have to say that I was a bit disappointed First of all I feel she caricatures Bergson who I feel would be of an ally to the insights of neuroplasticity than she admits in the book I also don't know what Darwinian neuroscientists she's critiuing in the book but the short gloss she gives of natural selection is also uite superficial To be sure some people interpret natural selection as the best but nuanced interpretations show how it is basically the reaction of biology to the actions of the organism in the environment Her short description of neural connections as either growing or withering based upon which actions were performed would seem to accord with that description Finally I have to say that Malabou's interest in explosion seems uite aligned with the ideology of today It's like we're caught in a binary of just submitting to the demands to be flexible or we cease to be flexible and resist explosively the oppressions that are put upon us But this binary is itself a product of the time we live in She makes a feeble argument that some explosions are not in fact terrorist explosions of rage for example apparently saying that her own appeal to explosiveness isn't embedded in the same logic But that seems disingenuous I loved Malabou's argument that plasticity involves something than flexibility and to misrecognize this means that we simply submit to the ideology of precarious labor I find that to add a political dimension to other books in the philosophy of mind those of Francisco Varela and Andy Clark Yet I have to say that I find Varela Clark and Evan Thompson's analysis of the actual neurobiology to be detailed nuanced and compelling Perhaps her other books are better At Sixes And Sevens emphasized 'plasticity' the uality by which our brains develop and change throughout the course of our lives Our brains Save Rafe! (Middle School exist as historical products developing in interaction with themselves and with their surroundings Hence there is a thin line between the organization of the nervous system and the political and social organization that both conditions and is conditioned by human The Hand That First Held Mine experience Looking carefully at contemporary neuroscience it is hard not to notice tha This is my first reading of Malabou and I have to say that I was a bit disappointed First of all I feel she caricatures Bergson who I feel would be of an ally to the insights of neuroplasticity than she admits in the book I also don't know what Darwinian neuroscientists she's critiuing in the book but the short gloss she gives of natural selection is also uite superficial To be sure some people interpret natural selection as the best but nuanced interpretations show how it is basically the reaction of biology to the actions of the organism in the Ghost Light environment Her short description of neural connections as LDN Graffiti either growing or withering based upon which actions were performed would seem to accord with that description Finally I have to say that Malabou's interest in Sworn to Silence explosion seems uite aligned with the ideology of today It's like we're caught in a binary of just submitting to the demands to be flexible or we cease to be flexible and resist Frog Is Frog explosively the oppressions that are put upon us But this binary is itself a product of the time we live in She makes a feeble argument that some Doctor Who explosions are not in fact terrorist Secrets On Morgan Hill explosions of rage for Emma (Emma Trilogy example apparently saying that her own appeal to Conversations with James Baldwin explosiveness isn't Fifth Avenue, Uptown embedded in the same logic But that seems disingenuous I loved Malabou's argument that plasticity involves something than flexibility and to misrecognize this means that we simply submit to the ideology of precarious labor I find that to add a political dimension to other books in the philosophy of mind those of Francisco Varela and Andy Clark Yet I have to say that I find Varela Clark and Evan Thompson's analysis of the actual neurobiology to be detailed nuanced and compelling Perhaps her other books are better

Read & download Ý PDF, DOC, TXT, eBook or Kindle ePUB free â Catherine Malabou

T the new way of talking about the brain mirrors the management discourse of the neo liberal capitalist world in which we now live with its talk of decentralization networks and flexibility Consciously or unconsciously science cannot but echo the world in which it takes place In the neo liberal world 'plasticity' can be euated with 'flexibility'—a term that has become a buzzword in economics and management theory The plastic brain would thus represent just another style of power which although less centralized is still a means of control In this book Catherine Malabou A brilliant take on the plasticity of the brain and how the ability of our brains to receive form but also to structure form can lead to a dialectic of constancy v creation Within this resistance is needed to provoke the power of developing forces A great read especially for anyone who has read Ravaisson's Of Habit as it gives a scientific explanation as to how some of his ideas could manifest themselves