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To talk about being smart The best news is that emotional literacy is not fixed early in life Every parent every teacher every business leader and everyone interested in a civil society has a stake in this compelling vision of human possibility From the Trade Paperback edition There are some interesting things in the book things that are hard to disagree with such as emotional skills and self knowledge are important I think a lot of people who liked this book focused on that self help aspect I have no problem with that My problems with this book stem from the wider claims Goleman makes for E as a mental function Goleman bases this aspect of his theory on some whopping assumptions The biggest one is the idea that emotional intelligence even exists The main aspects of E he posits self awareness social awarenessetc aren't objectively measurable and there is no proof that they even correlate with one another on a neurological level which we would see if these aspects were part of a measurable form of human intelligence Another assumption is that there is an acceptable norm of emotional intelligence This raises the uestion what about people who don't meet the norm? Under Goleman's narrow definition people with autism even many on the high functioning end of the spectrum would not ualify as possessing a desirable E level neither would the introvert who prefers books to people It is here that I found Goleman's ideas to be particularly objectionable There's a whiff of something truly unpleasant here However we know that even people with severe autism are able to learn emotional skills Goleman makes the grand claim that throughout history great leaders all had high E levels As a historian this made me cringe when I first read it Unless one has access to a person's psychiatric records it is always extremely problematic to make all but the most ualified claims about the psychology of historical figures The E theory has many of the same flaws as theories of I Older I tests assumed that intelligence was easily measured and that there was a single kind of intelligence One freuently encountered people who had low I scores but who functioned intelligently or had highly advanced skills in some areas but not others We now speak of multiple intelligences seeing them as a skills set We might be born with a tendency to some intelligences over others but these are shaped by enviromental factors and can be influenced through learning rather than something neurologically innateI'm willing to accept the idea that people are born with a range of abilities to recognize and respond to emotional interaction I think these emotional responses are learned behaviors to a much greater degree than Goleman would allow The problem with books like Goleman's is that it presents one side of a very contentious debate but it might be the only book on the subject many people will read Modern Spain of human possibility From the Trade Paperback edition There are some interesting things in the book things that are hard to disagree with such as emotional skills and self knowledge are important I think a lot Journey into Madness of people who liked this book focused Sgàile (Espectro) (Espectro) (Taibhse, on that self help aspect I have no problem with that My problems with this book stem from the wider claims Goleman makes for E as a mental function Goleman bases this aspect Essential Classic X-Men, Vol. 3 of his theory Body Types on some whopping assumptions The biggest Ändere nicht deinen Partner, ändere dich selbst: Negative Beziehungsmuster erkennen und auflösen: So machen Sie nie wieder dieselben Fehler one is the idea that emotional intelligence even exists The main aspects Le Thésaurus - Dictionnaire des Analogies of E he posits self awareness social awarenessetc aren't Enslaved in Unknown World objectively measurable and there is no proof that they even correlate with The Mountain and the Fathers one another News from a New Republic on a neurological level which we would see if these aspects were part Beginner's Guide to ZBrush of a measurable form diseno de moda conceptos basicos y aplicaciones practicas de ilustracion de moda of human intelligence Another assumption is that there is an acceptable norm Los asquerosos of emotional intelligence This raises the uestion what about people who don't meet the norm? Under Goleman's narrow definition people with autism even many Speakout Advanced Plus 2nd Edition Students Book/DVD-ROM/Workbook/StudyBooster Spain Pack on the high functioning end Trilogía El Club of the spectrum would not ualify as possessing a desirable E level neither would the introvert who prefers books to people It is here that I found Goleman's ideas to be particularly GULLIVERS TRAVELS 1ºESO BAR objectionable There's a whiff Goddess Rising (Complicated Creatures of something truly unpleasant here However we know that even people with severe autism are able to learn emotional skills Goleman makes the grand claim that throughout history great leaders all had high E levels As a historian this made me cringe when I first read it Unless Complicated Creatures 1.5, A Companion Novella one has access to a person's psychiatric records it is always extremely problematic to make all but the most ualified claims about the psychology NEJ of historical figures The E theory has many Triplets Find a Mom of the same flaws as theories Silent Runners of I Older I tests assumed that intelligence was easily measured and that there was a single kind Foc latent of intelligence One freuently encountered people who had low I scores but who functioned intelligently Mrs Queen Takes the Train or had highly advanced skills in some areas but not Planisferio celeste. Dos caras. Reversible. Castellano. Editorial Mapiberia & Global Mapping. others We now speak Retorno a Los Origenes of multiple intelligences seeing them as a skills set We might be born with a tendency to some intelligences Em Teu Ventre over Billionaires Sissy Cuckold others but these are shaped by enviromental factors and can be influenced through learning rather than something neurologically innateI'm willing to accept the idea that people are born with a range Waiting for the Monsoon of abilities to recognize and respond to emotional interaction I think these emotional responses are learned behaviors to a much greater degree than Goleman would allow The problem with books like Goleman's is that it presents Ezekiel nora ezean (Taupadak) one side WordPress 5. La guía completa (Social Media) of a very contentious debate but it might be the Intensidad Max : Un plan de ejercicios y nutrición para sacar lo mejor de ti misma en sólo 90 días (Psicología y salud) only book Sugaar (Xaguxar) on the subject many people will read

characters Emotional Intelligence

Emotional Intelligence

D the emotional and how they together shape our destinyThrough vivid examples Goleman delineates the five crucial skills of emotional intelligence and shows how they determine our success in relationships work and even our physical well being What emerges is an entirely new way After several years of looking at this seminal work on my to read list I am happy to have finally read it It should be on the to read list of educators and parents To learn and to grow children first need to be ready to learn and to grow However how and what we need to learn today can differ significantly from the reuirements of our ancestors Evolution euipped us with an early warning system the limbic system of our brains and its marvelous filter the amygdala This system connects sensory perception to emotional reactions based on experiences encountered in environments where survival depended on immediate and intense responses fight or flight When you are hunting a woolly mammoth or being hunted by a saber toothed tiger careful analysis can be less helpful than a rush of adrenaline filled momentum Fortunately evolution has also met modern day needs The limbic core of our brains is surrounded by the neo cortex The front part of this add on to human brains which continues to grow after birth is larger than in other animals and highly malleable The way this area develops is the key to emotional intelligenceThe proficiency with which we identify and deal with the emotions engendered in the limbic system is the measure of how well we can avoid becoming victims of what Goleman terms 'emotional hijacking' It would be futile to try to suppress these emotions entirely he tells us but success or failure in monitoring and controlling them is the yardstick of emotional intelligenceGenetics Goleman believes do play a part here The very outlooks with which we are born optimistic or pessimistic indicate obvious propensities for high or low emotional intelligence The incredible plasticity of our brains though means we are not prisoners of nature If we consciously develop those neural pathways to the parts of our brains associated with attending to emotions we can strengthen a 'self aware' style of managing them that Goleman notes is so much effective than what he calls 'engulfed' and 'accepting' styles While recent studies have indicated the remarkable adaptability of the brain into old age it is during childhood and adolescence Goleman notes where we have the largest 'windows of opportunity' Since 'Emotional Intelligence' first came out fifteen years ago 'emotional literacy' has earned a place in the curriculum of many schools Reading the book strengthened my desire for a continuation of this trend Without emotional intelligence we are susceptible to 'flooding' where an emotional response such as anger generates anger Goleman's description of the biology here is fascinating Anger is amplified as our brains release catecholamines neurotransmitters that keep the nervous system ramped up and raring to goWhen children are 'flooded' they can not be good students 'A child's readiness for school' Goleman writes 'depends on the most basic of all knowledge how to learn' He goes on to list important attributes of that readiness from a report by the National Center for Clinical Infant Programs confidence curiosity intentionality self control relatedness capacity to communicate and cooperativeness 'Emotional Intelligence' is not only a manual for childhood education Reading it really made me think about my own style of managing my own emotions In particular two observations by Goleman really resonated with me One is that men it appears generally have a lower threshold for 'flooding' than women If that seems counter intuitive it's because men often use withdrawal stonewalling as a way of dealing with flooding rather than the self expression we stereotypically associate with femininityThe second is Goleman's consideration of substance abuse as self medication People who are prone to addiction may actually be searching for control of depression anxiety or rageThe importance of 'Emotional Intelligence' is apparent in the many references made to it in popular culture It is also an accessible and entertaining book that deserves a place on the shelves of those concerned with learning and the brain Infidelidad Consentida, vol. 2 our destinyThrough vivid examples Goleman delineates the five crucial skills The NexStar User's Guide of emotional intelligence and shows how they determine Doblaje our success in relationships work and even Time Warp our physical well being What emerges is an entirely new way After several years 7 Claves para Potenciar tu Lenguaje Corporal of looking at this seminal work Blood Diamonds (Ben Kamal and Danielle Barnea, on my to read list I am happy to have finally read it It should be Ghita Two on the to read list The 8-Minute Writing Habit of educators and parents To learn and to grow children first need to be ready to learn and to grow However how and what we need to learn today can differ significantly from the reuirements Impredecible (La llave de su destino of Tras la piel ajena our ancestors Evolution euipped us with an early warning system the limbic system Повест за Зоя и Шура of Повест за Зоя и Шура of Faculty of Fire on experiences encountered in environments where survival depended Es gribu dejot simt gadu on immediate and intense responses fight Bioloxia e Xeoloxía 1º ESO (SomosLink) - 9788490461075 or flight When you are hunting a woolly mammoth Serena (Doncellas Coloniales, or being hunted by a saber toothed tiger careful analysis can be less helpful than a rush The Best Science Fiction of the Year 6 of adrenaline filled momentum Fortunately evolution has also met modern day needs The limbic core Star Songs of An Old Primate of Screening the Golden Ages of the Classical Tradition our brains is surrounded by the neo cortex The front part Hydes Absolution (Sydney Storm MC of this add Eagles and Bulldogs in Normandy, 1944 on to human brains which continues to grow after birth is larger than in El sueño de mi desvelo: Historias nocturnas e imborrables de la NBA (Deportes (corner)) other animals and highly malleable The way this area develops is the key to emotional intelligenceThe proficiency with which we identify and deal with the emotions engendered in the limbic system is the measure Juegos, Deporte Y Sociedad. Léxico De Praxiología Motriz (Educación Física/Pedagogía/Juegos) of how well we can avoid becoming victims Compórtate (ENSAYO) of what Goleman terms 'emotional hijacking' It would be futile to try to suppress these emotions entirely he tells us but success The Bible of Dark Arts or failure in monitoring and controlling them is the yardstick Agatha Raisin and the Terrible Tourist (Agatha Raisin, of emotional intelligenceGenetics Goleman believes do play a part here The very Tödlicher Schnee outlooks with which we are born The Little Red Book of Running optimistic In The Mood - Vocal or pessimistic indicate Piso Christ obvious propensities for high One Hour in Paris or low emotional intelligence The incredible plasticity Rabbits, Crabs, Etc. of Taming the Alphas our brains though means we are not prisoners Die Matty Sinclair Trilogie (Matt Sinclair, of nature If we consciously develop those neural pathways to the parts El enroque. ¡Uy, qué miedo! of Super Late Bloomer our brains associated with attending to emotions we can strengthen a 'self aware' style Fake Fiancée of managing them that Goleman notes is so much effective than what he calls 'engulfed' and 'accepting' styles While recent studies have indicated the remarkable adaptability Ramayana of the brain into Wake Me Up! old age it is during childhood and adolescence Goleman notes where we have the largest 'windows Insoluble mais vrai ! of The Fast Metabolism Diet opportunity' Since 'Emotional Intelligence' first came Uncle Mame out fifteen years ago 'emotional literacy' has earned a place in the curriculum The Centre of My World of many schools Reading the book strengthened my desire for a continuation Sueños de cristal of this trend Without emotional intelligence we are susceptible to 'flooding' where an emotional response such as anger generates anger Goleman's description The Dove (The Villain Duology, of the biology here is fascinating Anger is amplified as El deseo de lo imposible our brains release catecholamines neurotransmitters that keep the nervous system ramped up and raring to goWhen children are 'flooded' they can not be good students 'A child's readiness for school' Goleman writes 'depends Wicca Herbal Magic: A Beginner’s Guide to Practicing Wiccan Herbal Magic, with Simple Herb Spells on the most basic The Confessions of Augustine of Hippo of all knowledge how to learn' He goes Confessions of a Sinner on to list important attributes Alguien Bajo Los Parpados of that readiness from a report by the National Center for Clinical Infant Programs confidence curiosity intentionality self control relatedness capacity to communicate and cooperativeness 'Emotional Intelligence' is not The Vault only a manual for childhood education Reading it really made me think about my For the Love of Cockroaches: Husbandry, Biology, and History of Pet and Feeder Blattodea own style On World Peace of managing my Camino de las hormigas, El own emotions In particular two Pathfinder Adventure Path observations by Goleman really resonated with me One is that men it appears generally have a lower threshold for 'flooding' than women If that seems counter intuitive it's because men Invasion 1940 often use withdrawal stonewalling as a way Highlander Found: A Scottish Time Travel Romance (Highlander In Time Book 1) of dealing with flooding rather than the self expression we stereotypically associate with femininityThe second is Goleman's consideration Méthode de français. 1 ESO. Promenade - 9788467562644 of substance abuse as self medication People who are prone to addiction may actually be searching for control Taina. O nouã incursiune în irealitatea imediatã of depression anxiety The Truth about Crocodiles or rageThe importance Never give up: Secretos de una muser (Hobbies) of 'Emotional Intelligence' is apparent in the many references made to it in popular culture It is also an accessible and entertaining book that deserves a place How the Universe Got Its Spots on the shelves In the Beat of a Heart of those concerned with learning and the brain

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Everyone knows that high I is no guarantee of success happiness or virtue but until Emotional Intelligence we could only guess why Daniel Goleman's brilliant report from the frontiers of psychology and neuroscience offers startling new insight into our two minds the rational an This visionary book by Daniel Goleman is one of the most important in my collection I see it as a seminal contribution to understanding the human condition and a roadmap of practical steps for living better both within ourselves and with those around usI begin by recommending the excellent review by Lars a clear well written summary of the major points in the bookHere I will focus on 3 topics from the book 1 the evolution of brain mechanisms for emotional and rational behavior; 2 how these mechanisms can be hijacked in modern life both accidentally and intentionally; and 3 the critical need for properly balancing emotion and rational thought in ourselves and our society The latter challenge has given rise to extremely important research and training endeavors and I believe these will become even important in the foreseeable future I see these endeavors as promising and significant career paths for those who pursue themFor information on the brain systems discussed below McGill University has an excellent web site with helpful graphics background and discussion at three levels of complexity starting with the basics The links below are to this siteBrain evolutionTo understand Goleman’s message it is important to consider the human brain as an evolutionary seuence We can think of it as a layer cake assembled one layer at a time The important point is that each layer in the seuence was originally the 'executive' in a functioning brain with no obvious need for a higher layer We can think about this seuence by considering a frog a ‘primitive’ mammal such as a mouse and a humanThe most obvious difference among these three brains is the relative amount of cerebral neocortex The frog has essentially none just a small bulge called ‘cerebrum’ The major portion of this ‘reptilian brain’ closely resembles the brainstem in humans where vital body functions such as heart rate and respiration are controlled plus a cerebellum for fine motor control The mouse has a relatively well developed limbic system discussed below and a respectable neocortex But the human brain is completely dominated by the massively overgrown neocortex which must be intricately lobed and folded to fit within the skullSo what does all that neocortex do in humans? Put simply it thinks It makes associations provides context and makes decisions to guide behavior in a complex world Most other parts of the brain carry out simple sensory processing or stereotyped motor programs or convey information from periphery to cortex or vice versa Cortex takes crudely processed inputs mostly from the thalamus and identifies salient features speech faces odors By analyzing these features it provides a rich context for making informed decisions and choosing appropriate actionsWell don’t frogs need a lot of cortex to process information and make adaptive decisions? Actually they don’t They have gotten along just fine without it for many millions of years The tradeoff is that they can only perform a limited analysis of sensory inputs and produce a limited and stereotyped array of behaviors Mice with a significant amount of cortex can perform sophisticated processing and behaviors and can show some behavioral adaptation learning Now here is the really important part Humans did not lose or replace the amphibian or ‘primitive’ mammalian brain Basically they just added really elaborate processing layers neocortex on top of them All of that cortical hardware has to work through lower centers that are for the most part uite similar to those found in other vertebratesA neurologist colleague elegantly summarized this concept for the medical students I was teaching in a review session for our neuroanatomy lab exam He pointed to a structure in the human brainstem that assists in fine tuning motor control inferior olive He said “this structure evolved to help a frog catch a fly by jumping accurately toward the target We have to use it to do things like play piano and tap dance It takes a lot of cortical machinery to get that kind of performance from those cells”It isn’t uite that simple of course but the analogy is a very good one And this key concept is at the core of Goleman’s magnificent bookGood amygdala bad amygdalaWith this evolutionary framework in place we can consider the relative role of the limbic system ‘emotional brain’ which first emerged in early mammals One of its key components the amygdala is a sort of emotional activation zone for the brain One of its critical functions is to serve as an early warning system for danger such as approaching predators and trigger very rapid fight or flight sympathetic responses It gets direct but crude visual and auditory inputs and processes them uickly than neocortex In effect a portion of the amygdala sits and asks ‘should I panic? should I panic?’ like an endless loop in software These responses are of course extremely useful when there is real dangerThe difficulty is that in the ‘civilized’ and complex world of humans the amygdala can generate many false alarms Even worse in extreme situations it can take preemptive control of behavior and trigger blind rage panic or other destructive responses In those cases the overgrown neocortex that underlies uniue human behavior is left out of the loop And this is where the trouble starts By analogy neocortex is the executive who normally runs the company but the workers can rebel and take over the production line Examples from everyday life I blew up; I don’t know what came over me; I just lost my head Actually your amygdala came over you and shut down your neocortexTruth or conseuencesBeing emotionally intelligent in Dan Goleman’s brilliant synthesis means that you understand the destructive potential of emotions and actively find ways to minimize or eliminate the destruction To do this you must put a neocortical wisdom about emotions at the front end of your own thought process – an executive in the chain of command The job of this executive is to find constructive ways to channel and control both your emotions and those of others This idea is consistent with the notions of mindful meditation and the best of religious thought In other words it is a prescription for a long term sustainable vision of human existence To me this is the most profound element of Dan Goleman’s visionSounds pretty simple right? So why is it so difficult for so many people? One big reason is that a great deal of money can be made by encouraging precisely the opposite response Firing up the limbic system to spew out fear outrage and hate is good for business Movie and TV producers and writers may not know the difference between the limbic system and limbo but they are experts at fueling emotional responses for profit In stark contrast calm rational appeals to the better angels of our nature face a steep uphill climb Fear and loathing are much easier to induce and much marketable Those with emotional wisdom understand that except in the most extreme cases fire cannot be fought with fire But they must also understand that it is easier to start a fire and fan the flames than to put it outMoving forwardTo me a central challenge of our times is to find an adaptive balance between rational and emotional responses in our lives and culture To do this we must put the reasoning cortex in


10 thoughts on “Emotional Intelligence

  1. says:

    Descriptive but not very practical The main and only thesis of the book is emotional intelligence is important That's it Goleman spends over 13 hours in this audiobook to pretty much buttress the thesis with evidence from various sources including psychology medicine and educational programsThe content is interesting at times but overall the message got repetitive and I was looking for any useful information to put to use in my daily life from the book to no avail Unfortunately the book is very much descriptive and normative but not very useful or practical He describes what emotional intelligence is and makes a strong case for its importance over I but fails to make it relevant to daily lifeAlso the content is not as groundbreaking as it used to be due to the recent proliferation of studies research and books on the subject which could be precisely because of this book but I plead insufficient knowledge on this matterSo overall I thought it was too long and not very practical but there were still some interesting facts


  2. says:

    This visionary book by Daniel Goleman is one of the most important in my collection I see it as a seminal contribution to understanding the human condition and a roadmap of practical steps for living better both within ourselves and with those around usI begin by recommending the excellent review by Lars a clear well written summary of the major points in the bookHere I will focus on 3 topics from the book 1 the evolution of brain mechanisms for emotional and rational behavior; 2 how these mechanisms can be hijacked in modern life both accidentally and intentionally; and 3 the critical need for properly balancing emotion and rational thought in ourselves and our society The latter challenge has given rise to extremely important research and training endeavors and I believe these will become even important in the foreseeable future I see these endeavors as promising and significant career paths for those who pursue themFor information on the brain systems discussed below McGill University has an excellent web site with helpful graphics background and discussion at three levels of complexity starting with the basics The links below are to this siteBrain evolutionTo understand Goleman’s message it is important to consider the human brain as an evolutionary seuence We can think of it as a layer cake assembled one layer at a time The important point is that each layer in the seuence was originally the 'executive' in a functioning brain with no obvious need for a higher layer We can think about this seuence by considering a frog a ‘primitive’ mammal such as a mouse and a humanThe most obvious difference among these three brains is the relative amount of cerebral neocortex The frog has essentially none just a small bulge called ‘cerebrum’ The major portion of this ‘reptilian brain’ closely resembles the brainstem in humans where vital body functions such as heart rate and respiration are controlled plus a cerebellum for fine motor control The mouse has a relatively well developed limbic system discussed below and a respectable neocortex But the human brain is completely dominated by the massively overgrown neocortex which must be intricately lobed and folded to fit within the skullSo what does all that neocortex do in humans? Put simply it thinks It makes associations provides context and makes decisions to guide behavior in a complex world Most other parts of the brain carry out simple sensory processing or stereotyped motor programs or convey information from periphery to cortex or vice versa Cortex takes crudely processed inputs mostly from the thalamus and identifies salient features speech faces odors By analyzing these features it provides a rich context for making informed decisions and choosing appropriate actionsWell don’t frogs need a lot of cortex to process information and make adaptive decisions? Actually they don’t They have gotten along just fine without it for many millions of years The tradeoff is that they can only perform a limited analysis of sensory inputs and produce a limited and stereotyped array of behaviors Mice with a significant amount of cortex can perform sophisticated processing and behaviors and can show some behavioral adaptation learning Now here is the really important part Humans did not lose or replace the amphibian or ‘primitive’ mammalian brain Basically they just added really elaborate processing layers neocortex on top of them All of that cortical hardware has to work through lower centers that are for the most part uite similar to those found in other vertebratesA neurologist colleague elegantly summarized this concept for the medical students I was teaching in a review session for our neuroanatomy lab exam He pointed to a structure in the human brainstem that assists in fine tuning motor control inferior olive He said “this structure evolved to help a frog catch a fly by jumping accurately toward the target We have to use it to do things like play piano and tap dance It takes a lot of cortical machinery to get that kind of performance from those cells”It isn’t uite that simple of course but the analogy is a very good one And this key concept is at the core of Goleman’s magnificent bookGood amygdala bad amygdalaWith this evolutionary framework in place we can consider the relative role of the limbic system ‘emotional brain’ which first emerged in early mammals One of its key components the amygdala is a sort of emotional activation zone for the brain One of its critical functions is to serve as an early warning system for danger such as approaching predators and trigger very rapid fight or flight sympathetic responses It gets direct but crude visual and auditory inputs and processes them uickly than neocortex In effect a portion of the amygdala sits and asks ‘should I panic? should I panic?’ like an endless loop in software These responses are of course extremely useful when there is real dangerThe difficulty is that in the ‘civilized’ and complex world of humans the amygdala can generate many false alarms Even worse in extreme situations it can take preemptive control of behavior and trigger blind rage panic or other destructive responses In those cases the overgrown neocortex that underlies uniue human behavior is left out of the loop And this is where the trouble starts By analogy neocortex is the executive who normally runs the company but the workers can rebel and take over the production line Examples from everyday life I blew up; I don’t know what came over me; I just lost my head Actually your amygdala came over you and shut down your neocortexTruth or conseuencesBeing emotionally intelligent in Dan Goleman’s brilliant synthesis means that you understand the destructive potential of emotions and actively find ways to minimize or eliminate the destruction To do this you must put a neocortical wisdom about emotions at the front end of your own thought process – an executive in the chain of command The job of this executive is to find constructive ways to channel and control both your emotions and those of others This idea is consistent with the notions of mindful meditation and the best of religious thought In other words it is a prescription for a long term sustainable vision of human existence To me this is the most profound element of Dan Goleman’s visionSounds pretty simple right? So why is it so difficult for so many people? One big reason is that a great deal of money can be made by encouraging precisely the opposite response Firing up the limbic system to spew out fear outrage and hate is good for business Movie and TV producers and writers may not know the difference between the limbic system and limbo but they are experts at fueling emotional responses for profit In stark contrast calm rational appeals to the better angels of our nature face a steep uphill climb Fear and loathing are much easier to induce and much marketable Those with emotional wisdom understand that except in the most extreme cases fire cannot be fought with fire But they must also understand that it is easier to start a fire and fan the flames than to put it outMoving forwardTo me a central challenge of our times is to find an adaptive balance between rational and emotional responses in our lives and culture To do this we must put the reasoning cortex in charge of our thoughts and decisions – guided but not overwhelmed by emotions Fail to find this balance and disaster will follow This point is stressed by the following uote from the book“Each day’s news comes to us rife with reports of the disintegration of civility and safety an onslaught of mean spirited impulse running amok But the news simply reflects back to us on a larger scale a creeping sense of emotions out of control in our own lives and in those of the people around us No one is insulated from this erratic tide of outburst and regret; it reaches into all of our lives in one way or another”How can these stark realities be reconciled with the urgent need for rational policy decisions in a world that hovers on the edge of economic and environmental disaster? Another uote“This book is a guide to making sense of the senselessness I have been struck by two opposing trends one portraying a growing calamity in our shared emotional life the other offering some hopeful remedies”Only by building on those hopeful remedies can we take positive steps with a definite plan This is big important work and visionary thinkers like Daniel Goleman are pointing the way to constructive steps that can be taken both now and in the future


  3. says:

    Emotional Intelligence is a book that was recommended to read on a management course that I took oh some time way back towards the beginning of the century The course was taught by a middle aged white woman from southern Africa She also recommend Covey's book The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People but in my enthusiasm that didn't put me off from reading this perhaps because of an exercise she conducted with us in which you think of something that you'd like to do but haven't done and then trace back the reasons why you have not done this thing until you get down to fear This resonated with me view spoiler although I could not get this to work when I tried it on someone else hide spoiler


  4. says:

    After several years of looking at this seminal work on my to read list I am happy to have finally read it It should be on the to read list of educators and parents To learn and to grow children first need to be ready to learn and to grow However how and what we need to learn today can differ significantly from the reuirements of our ancestors Evolution euipped us with an early warning system the limbic system of our brains and its marvelous filter the amygdala This system connects sensory perception to emotional reactions based on experiences encountered in environments where survival depended on immediate and intense responses fight or flight When you are hunting a woolly mammoth or being hunted by a saber toothed tiger careful analysis can be less helpful than a rush of adrenaline filled momentum Fortunately evolution has also met modern day needs The limbic core of our brains is surrounded by the neo cortex The front part of this add on to human brains which continues to grow after birth is larger than in other animals and highly malleable The way this area develops is the key to emotional intelligenceThe proficiency with which we identify and deal with the emotions engendered in the limbic system is the measure of how well we can avoid becoming victims of what Goleman terms 'emotional hijacking' It would be futile to try to suppress these emotions entirely he tells us but success or failure in monitoring and controlling them is the yardstick of emotional intelligenceGenetics Goleman believes do play a part here The very outlooks with which we are born optimistic or pessimistic indicate obvious propensities for high or low emotional intelligence The incredible plasticity of our brains though means we are not prisoners of nature If we consciously develop those neural pathways to the parts of our brains associated with attending to emotions we can strengthen a 'self aware' style of managing them that Goleman notes is so much effective than what he calls 'engulfed' and 'accepting' styles While recent studies have indicated the remarkable adaptability of the brain into old age it is during childhood and adolescence Goleman notes where we have the largest 'windows of opportunity' Since 'Emotional Intelligence' first came out fifteen years ago 'emotional literacy' has earned a place in the curriculum of many schools Reading the book strengthened my desire for a continuation of this trend Without emotional intelligence we are susceptible to 'flooding' where an emotional response such as anger generates anger Goleman's description of the biology here is fascinating Anger is amplified as our brains release catecholamines neurotransmitters that keep the nervous system ramped up and raring to goWhen children are 'flooded' they can not be good students 'A child's readiness for school' Goleman writes 'depends on the most basic of all knowledge how to learn' He goes on to list important attributes of that readiness from a report by the National Center for Clinical Infant Programs confidence curiosity intentionality self control relatedness capacity to communicate and cooperativeness 'Emotional Intelligence' is not only a manual for childhood education Reading it really made me think about my own style of managing my own emotions In particular two observations by Goleman really resonated with me One is that men it appears generally have a lower threshold for 'flooding' than women If that seems counter intuitive it's because men often use withdrawal stonewalling as a way of dealing with flooding rather than the self expression we stereotypically associate with femininityThe second is Goleman's consideration of substance abuse as self medication People who are prone to addiction may actually be searching for control of depression anxiety or rageThe importance of 'Emotional Intelligence' is apparent in the many references made to it in popular culture It is also an accessible and entertaining book that deserves a place on the shelves of those concerned with learning and the brain


  5. says:

    It certainly contains a lot of useful info but boy is it ever dense Reading it is like hacking your way through a dense jungle with a dull machete It must also be noted that it is most definitely of the school of 80's90's hard wired thinking about the brain and hard sells the view that to put it simply mind comes from brain and not the other way around In other words nature not nurture For comparison try Sharon Begley's Train Your Mind Change Your Brain which oddly enough has a preface by Goleman A further note I get the distinct impression that Goleman doesn't really like people that don't fit in There is little sympathy or compassion for anyone who is a little different or not accepted by their peers and there's a negative tone directed toward social outcasts in general even those who happen to be children Sample subheading from the book The Making Of A Social Incompetent


  6. says:

    Recommended to If you think you don't have a high I and thus your are condemned to a mediocre life What this book is aboutThe apostleship of the book is twofold Firstly it is to convince you that E matters far than I in achieving high levels of success and it does it perfectly through providing N1 lengthy repetitive case studiesSecond it provides an almost accurate introduction to what E is what elements contribute to a high E and finally what the conseuences of strength and weakness in each element would bePros of the book are as follows1 It fulfils its apostleship very well and by having it finished given that you might be hopeless regarding the possibility of one day becoming a highly successful figure you will be motivated to cultivate your emotional skillsCons of the book are as follows1 In explaining each aspect of the E and results of weakness and strength in that attribute the book is tooooooooooooo lengthy and repetitive 2 The book is by no means practical and provides merely an overview of what can be done to obviate the weaknesses Here are some selections of insightful parts of the bookAll emotions are in essence to act the instant plans for handling life that evolution has instilled in us When you are under stress you are functioning on lower primitive part of your brain while your higher part of the brain neocortexwhich is your rational conscious thinking mechanism goes offline that's why under stress people cannot think stress or even remember simple facts At best I contributes about 20 percent to the factors that determine life success which leaves 80 percent to other factors namely emotional intelligence abilities such as self motivation impulse control and delaying gratification regulating one's mood etc We often have little or no control over when we are swept by emotion nor over what emotion it will beBut we can have some say in how long an emotion will last The we ruminate about what has made us angry the good reasons and self justifications for being angry we can invent Brooding fuels anger's flames But seeing things differently douses those flames Distraction is one of the most potent mood altering devices Being worry psychologically gives us the illusion of being in control and prepared for potential dangers while none actually exists Saddness can be good Sadness that a loss brings closes down our interest in diversions and pleasures fixes our attention on what has been lost and saps our energy for starting new endeavours Thoughts are associated in the mind not just by content but by mood Depressed people hence jump from one depressing thought to another Distraction would be a potent remedy Good moods while they last enhance the ability to think flexibly and with complexity thus making it easier to find solutions to problems whether intellectual or interpersonal Optimism and hope like helplessness and despair can be learned You learn at your best when you have something your care about and you can get pleasure from being engaged in


  7. says:

    I read this book after a big break up and it really opened my eyes to how I contributed to that break up It's extremely important to have emotional intelligence and this is a fascinating discussion behind the theory and science of EI


  8. says:

    There are some interesting things in the book things that are hard to disagree with such as emotional skills and self knowledge are important I think a lot of people who liked this book focused on that self help aspect I have no problem with that My problems with this book stem from the wider claims Goleman makes for E as a mental function Goleman bases this aspect of his theory on some whopping assumptions The biggest one is the idea that emotional intelligence even exists The main aspects of E he posits self awareness social awarenessetc aren't objectively measurable and there is no proof that they even correlate with one another on a neurological level which we would see if these aspects were part of a measurable form of human intelligence Another assumption is that there is an acceptable norm of emotional intelligence This raises the uestion what about people who don't meet the norm? Under Goleman's narrow definition people with autism even many on the high functioning end of the spectrum would not ualify as possessing a desirable E level neither would the introvert who prefers books to people It is here that I found Goleman's ideas to be particularly objectionable There's a whiff of something truly unpleasant here However we know that even people with severe autism are able to learn emotional skills Goleman makes the grand claim that throughout history great leaders all had high E levels As a historian this made me cringe when I first read it Unless one has access to a person's psychiatric records it is always extremely problematic to make all but the most ualified claims about the psychology of historical figures The E theory has many of the same flaws as theories of I Older I tests assumed that intelligence was easily measured and that there was a single kind of intelligence One freuently encountered people who had low I scores but who functioned intelligently or had highly advanced skills in some areas but not others We now speak of multiple intelligences seeing them as a skills set We might be born with a tendency to some intelligences over others but these are shaped by enviromental factors and can be influenced through learning rather than something neurologically innateI'm willing to accept the idea that people are born with a range of abilities to recognize and respond to emotional interaction I think these emotional responses are learned behaviors to a much greater degree than Goleman would allow The problem with books like Goleman's is that it presents one side of a very contentious debate but it might be the only book on the subject many people will read


  9. says:

    I think the best part of the book is when he explained about the five major components of the emotional intelligence as1 Self awareness Recognize and understand your own moods and motivations and their effect on others To achieve this state you must be able to monitor your own emotional state and identify your own emotions Emotional Maturity in this trait shows Confidence Sense of humor can laugh at self Aware of your impression on others can read the reactions of others to know how you are perceived2 Self Regulation Controlling your impulses—instead of being uick to react rashly you can reign in your emotions and think before responding You express yourself appropriately Emotional Maturity in this trait shows Conscientious and take personal responsibility for your own workdeeds Adaptable and favorable to change When someone is complaining or is rude to you you do not respond in kind You respond in a manner which would not escalate the situation At this point you will also realize that when someone expresses anger at you they’re not always angry at you; they’re often just angry and want to take it out on someone3 Internal Motivation Internal motivation is marked by an interest in learning It is also self improvement vs a pursuit of wealth and status as a pursuit of wealth and status is an external motivator Emotional Maturity in this trait shows Initiative and the commitment to complete a task Perseverance in the face of adversity4 Empathy The ability to understand another person’s emotional reaction This is only possible when one has achieved self awareness—as one cannot understand others until they understand themselves Emotional Maturity in this trait shows Perceptive of other’s emotions and taking an active interest in their concerns Proactive—able to anticipate someone’s needs and the appropriate reaction Social Situations such as office politics do not phase one who has a firm grasp of empathy5 Social Skills Identifying social cues to establish common ground manage relationships and build networks Emotional Maturity in this trait shows Communication Listening and responding appropriately Influence and Leadership The ability to guide and inspire others Conflict Management The ability to diffuse difficult situations using persuasion and negotiation


  10. says:

    Old but Gold ☺


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