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Pain and pleasure alone guide our actions  Yet new research using fMRI – including a great deal of original research conducted by Lieberman and his UCLA lab shows that our brains react to social pain and pleasure in much the same way as they do to physical pain and pleasure  Fortunately the brain has evolved sophisticated mechanisms for securing our place in the social world  We have a uniue ability to read other people’s minds to figure out their hopes fears and motivations allowing us to effectively coordinate our lives with one another  And our most private sense of who we are is intimately linked to the important people and groups in our lives  This wiring often leads us to restrain our selfi SOCIAL WHY O Guide de la Zarzuela by Lieberman and his UCLA lab shows that our The Rebellion brains react to social pain and pleasure in much the same way as they do to physical pain and pleasure  Fortunately the The Deception of the Emerald Ring (Pink Carnation, brain has evolved sophisticated mechanisms for securing our place in the social world  We have a uniue ability to read other people’s minds to figure out their hopes fears and motivations allowing us to effectively coordinate our lives with one another  And our most private sense of who we are is intimately linked to the important people and groups in our lives  This wiring often leads us to restrain our selfi SOCIAL WHY O

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Social Author Matthew D. Lieberman

We are profoundly social creatures – than we know  In Social renowned psychologist Matthew Lieberman explores groundbreaking research in social neuroscience revealing that our need to connect with other people is even fundamental basic than our need for food or shelter  Because of this our brain uses its spare time to learn about the social world – other people and our relation to them It is believed that we must commit 10000 hours to master a skill  According to Lieberman each of us has spent 10000 hours learning to make sense of people and groups by the time we are ten   Social argues that our need to reach out to and connect with others is a primary driver behind our behavior  We believe that Humans are n Tricky Twenty-Two (Stephanie Plum, basic than our need for food or shelter  Because of this our The End of the Line brain uses its spare time to learn about the social world – other people and our relation to them It is The Ear Book believed that we must commit 10000 hours to master a skill  According to Lieberman each of us has spent 10000 hours learning to make sense of people and groups Doors Open by the time we are ten   Social argues that our need to reach out to and connect with others is a primary driver I Blame The Scapegoats behind our Beneath the Earth behavior  We Gagged believe that Humans are n

Matthew D. Lieberman Ä 2 Review

Sh impulses for the greater good  These mechanisms lead to behavior that might seem irrational but is really just the result of our deep social wiring and necessary for our success as a species   Based on the latest cutting edge research the findings in Social have important real world implications  Our schools and businesses for example attempt to minimalize social distractions  But this is exactly the wrong thing to do to encourage engagement and learning and literally shuts down the social brain leaving powerful neuro cognitive resources untapped  The insights revealed in this pioneering book suggest ways to improve learning in schools make the workplace productive and improve our overall well bei It’s rare Camping Makes Me Happy behavior that might seem irrational Idols for Destruction but is really just the result of our deep social wiring and necessary for our success as a species   Based on the latest cutting edge research the findings in Social have important real world implications  Our schools and The Daughter of Time (Inspector Alan Grant businesses for example attempt to minimalize social distractions  But this is exactly the wrong thing to do to encourage engagement and learning and literally shuts down the social Tricky Twenty-Two (Stephanie Plum, brain leaving powerful neuro cognitive resources untapped  The insights revealed in this pioneering The End of the Line book suggest ways to improve learning in schools make the workplace productive and improve our overall well The Ear Book bei It’s rare


10 thoughts on “Social Author Matthew D. Lieberman

  1. says:

    A compelling examination of how our relationships with other people have a tremendous influence over the way our brains work


  2. says:

    Humans are naturally social animals yes even those who are anti social The uestion is why? Is it simply to forward our population? Or is there to it? Professor and award winning neuroscientist Matthew D Lieberman looks at this astounding but rather new field in “Social Why Our Brains Are Wired to Connect” Lieberman begins “Social” with a basic overview of his thesis as he sets out to prove that the brain feels social pain in the same way as physical that social thinking is a separate mental process from say a math problem versus being a topic switch and that social thinking is a “default network” being crucial beyond evolution With that being said “Social” is not too basic or oversimplified like most other social neuroscience books and focuses on the science side making it a meatier read but still processing humor and style attracting an average reader although it can be admittedly overwhelming at times “Social” is amazingly compelling and applies to everyone everywhere; allowing the reader to think in terms of science biology evolution neuroscience philosophy and psychology It leaves the reader with noteshighlights which beg to be shared in daily conversation Lieberman explores insightful topics and dives into the brain in a memorable way One will analyze future social interactions after reading the bookThe major highlight of “Social” is the large collection of primary research conducted by Lieberman and his colleagues This is much credible and impressive than the other recently released social scienceneuroscience books which basically explain outdated secondary research Lieberman’s first hand examinations apply to current affairstrends such as social media websites like Facebook On the other hand there are uestionable moments where Lieberman mentions studies also demonstrated in other books but analyzed differently and applied to support his views This makes one uestion all scientists“Social” is supplemented by various chartsdiagramsillustrations which aides the reader in gaining a visual helping to break overly educational sections In fact Lieberman successfully maintains the pace but breaks each chapter into manageable topics The biggest ualm with “Social” is that although Lieberman demonstrates with clarity how our brains are wired to be social and even when; he doesn’t truly convince of the why in the book’s title Lieberman continuously mentions that there is to being social than just procreating but he doesn’t genuinely explain his thoughts on it Or if he does it clearly is not well detailed because the reader has a difficult time remembering There are moments when Lieberman seemingly weakens on a tangent but then reins the reader in explaining the connections This shows the accessibility of “Social” and the impact of Lieberman’s thesis Plus the other topics are compelling in their own right Respectfully Lieberman doesn’t merely present biased views only supporting his thesis He also features studies from opposing camps giving “Social” a well rounded argument and upping the knowledge ante This not only strengthens “Social” as a whole but also gives merit to Lieberman as a scientistAlthough minor a noticeable annoyance was Lieberman’s habit of mentioning his wife and son in a way which was clearly a “shout out” Although this may be romantic for his wife it comes off as unprofessional for a reader seeking science The final uarter of “Social” strays slightly from the primary science but applies what has been learned to Lieberman’s ideas on how we can use our brain’s natural propensity to socialize in jobs education and organizational structures Sadly even though these ideas are intriguing well argued and do convince the reader to readjust views; they are also too grandiose for society to ever implore not saying they wouldn’t be beneficial though The Epilogue sums up the ideas in the book and also discusses the future of the field; truly solidifying how much we still have left to learn about the brain regardless of how ‘modern’ we are Lieberman combines notes with sources but the listings are extensive which adds to his credibility However taking away from that is his thanking of “colleague Jonah Lehrer” which would have been best avoided as Lehrer is the author whose not one but two books have been removed from shelves and ceased publication due to plagiarism Overall “Social” processes some weaknesses and also fails to prove that brains are wired to be social for any other reason than the bettering of cooperation and society which was its aim to show On the other hand “Social” is well written extremely compelling teaches a wealth of knowledge and encourages the reader to view life differently It is much better than most of the social neuroscience books I have read and thus is recommended for those interested in how the brain and in essence “we” work


  3. says:

    When I got to the passage explaining how Tylenol works as effectively on emotional pain as it does physical pain I actually said Wow out loud There are many such wow out loud passages in this book Lieberman and his colleagues all of whom he generously mentions has conducted uietly revolutionary research on humanity's need for social connections and he explains clearly and in a manner accessible to laypersons how our human brains are built to crave emotional bonds with others and how that craving has helped us evolve His research is impressive his writing is engaging his findings are illuminating and the subject is fascinating This is an important book which will make the reader at least it made this reader appreciate the necessity of human connection


  4. says:

    Confession I didn't finish this book but I marked it as read The thing is I uit reading it because of me not because of the book classic its not you its me speech This book is well written and interesting even fascinating But I'm just not super interested in reading about the science of brainsI picked this one up because I was preaching a sermon on the Trinity and thus studying how humans are relational Since God as Trinity demonstrates that God is inherently relational God exists as a relation of Father Son and Spirit from forever than it makes sense that the universe ought to show relationships as vital Apparently as Liberman shows we humans are wired to connect Relationships are vitally important He even turns Maslow's hierarchy on its head saying relationships are as basic as food and water since infants cannot feed themselves In other words without relationship from the start humans would die Evolution Lieberman argues favored social connectionsI read about 13 of the book I preached the sermon even used a uote from the author There's a lot here and I'm sure I'd find it fascinating ButI'd rather finish the Dark Tower series by Stephen King And learn about the Enneagram Then read the pile of books I have which are mostly fiction and history I'm just not a science person That is I like science I'm glad vaccines exist and I find learning a bit of science like this book helpful But beyond wow science increasingly shows how relational humans are and here are two reasons why I am not really interested I'm not interested in reasons 3 15 So if you are someone interested in science check this one out If you are a person of faith who likes to see how the findings of science intersect maybe check this one out too Who knows maybe someday I'll run out of books and money to buy new books and finish this one But for nowbook six of the Dark Tower series is callingso farewell


  5. says:

    Have you ever read a book about something you were deeply interested in and finished it and thought you somehow now knew less about something than when you first started the book? That’s how I feel after finishing this bookI usually read a nonfiction book and take notes as I read I tried to do that with this book but found that when I got to the end of the book I hadn’t written a single thing downI’m not sure that I really understood anything in the book I reveal these things with honesty and some trepidation I want to assure you that I’m a fairly astute reader of all things psychological; my master’s degree is in psychology Nevertheless this book was over my head


  6. says:

    SOCIAL WHY OUR BRAINS ARE WIRED TO CONNECT by Matthew D LiebermanThe author Matthew D Lieberman presents and well defends his theory that human beings neurologically have a predisposition to be “social” and this has shaped the evolution of the species toward becoming and socially connected I recommend this book to students of life educators psychologists and parents of young beautiful minds This is an important book Why because it explains “us” and our true human nature to be social in need of connecting to each other and it emphasizes what the importance of recognizing this could mean to our further development and well being Lieberman turns many traditional psychological concepts and theories of what motivates us as human beings around and upside down For instance he presents and supports the idea that our social psychological needs are actually important to satisfy first than our biological needs with the biological needs depending on the satisfying of the most basic social need first His example of this inverts Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs and suggests that the most fundamental human need for the helpless newborn infant is social connection first needing a caregiver to help himher satisfy basic biological needs If we acknowledge this innate need to be socially connected Lieberman suggests where we could be headed as a species in a positive and successful manner in education And with the awareness of this innate social need it is worth noting that he gives educators a workable blueprint to consider in reorienting priorities in teaching communications This is a very readable book While reading this book I felt like I was listening to everyone's favorite psychology professor explain some very complex subject matter including neurological studies and as I read I was sitting on the edge of my seat with excitement and enjoying the comedy he entertained us with in his examples I think he does a superb job of presenting studies in both social psychology and neuroscience to support his theory I would like to disclose that I acuired this book as a first reads winner and do thank the author for his generosityMartha Char Loveauthor of What's Behind Your Belly Button? A Psychological Perspective of the Intelligence of Human Nature and Gut Instinct andIncreasing Intuitional Intelligence How the Awareness of Instinctual Gut Feelings Fosters Human Learning Intuition and Longevity


  7. says:

    It’s rare to uncover a book about brain science that has a sense of humor I really enjoyed this book and learned a lot I learned about the curious ways that evolution our devilishly clever master builder has crafted the human brain to maximize our chances of survival It’s all about sociabilityAfter reading this book I thank God for wonderful things such as guilt shame ostracism revenge and clannishness Why? Because these negative social traits are proof of our most powerful survival tactic caring about what others think of us It made possible game changing human apps like big brains language delegation of labor domestication of animals and agricultureWhen voting most people don’t tend to cast their ballot for laws that optimize their own self interest instead they tend to vote for policies espoused by their tribe even if those policies hurt that particular individual For example a lot of rich people vote for higher taxes to help the poor Synchronicity with our tribe is often powerful than our own gratification That’s one mighty forceLeiberman shows how sociality became the mechanism that assured human groups did not suffer because of the selfishness of individuals Taking all the candy from the bowl would benefit the individual but not the group So mother nature has hardwired our brains to feel bad when we don’t leave some candy for others Just try cutting the line at the supermarket and you’ll be greeted with universal contempt Evolution has crafted our brains to take great joy in punishing narcissistic behaviorFor most of us we don’t even need others to shame us We do it ourselves And this is what assures the tribe does not falter because of runaway individual indulgence One of the most fiendish tortures invented by the penal system is solitary confinement which does nothing than deny the brain’s need for social interactionLeiberman reveals fascinating facts and the latest research on the subtle ways we are relentlessly driven to seek the approval of others He shows how so much of this is subconscious and happens automatically throughout our day Leiberman does a great job of aggregating the best research stories and shares revealing insights into how these social behaviors are the uintessential catalyst for humanity’s daily rhythms and greatest achievementsI leave this book with a greater appreciation and understanding of how caring for each other is one of the most powerful drivers of the human experience


  8. says:

    Liebermann argues that our social needs are one of the primary drives of our behavior In this book he cites several new studies using fMRI that show our behavior is influenced by much than pain and reward He begins by discussing the evolution of the social brain explains how altruism is favored over selfish behavior then gives an overview of the current studies done on mirror neurons Readers who have already read VS Ramachandran’s books and Marco Iacoboni’s book “Mirroring People” will have already been familiar with most of this information Further on he briefly discusses the social deficits in autism and the effects of social isolation on anxiety and depression not much new info there The last part of the book addresses the problematic environments in schools and workplaces that discourage socializing which he believes ultimately inhibits learning and harms productivity He makes a few suggestions on how to improve these environments; however they’re unlikely to ever be implemented anywhereOverall the book was well written and very accessible although most of the material was pretty familiar to me I’d recommend this to anyone interested in the subject that doesn’t already have several shelves full of psychology and neuroscience books


  9. says:

    Fascinating perspective that argues strongly for relocating social needs as the bedrock of Maslow's pyramid a central fact of our lives from the brain out rather than optional needs Lieberman makes a slew of connections between social psychology biology economics and political science full of familiar academic and cultural references I hope in future research he looks at how wiring for sensitivityinsensitivity both have complementary value to society and introversionextroversion which are innate temperamental orientations relate to larger findings about social needs and the benefits of orienting our cultural and economic structures to better meet those needs It also poses uestions for me about how natural inclinations towards collectivism are and how much increasing rates of anxiety and depression are fueled by a culturesociety that actively cuts off avenues for meeting social needs particularly in the anti collectivist US


  10. says:

    A very good source of information a real guide into the social layer of our brains and the inner wiring of our massive brain I enjoyed reading it a lot full of great ideas well organised many resources well linked to papers and researches it's based uponThe author did a very nice job in writing it simplifying as much as possible the explanations although sometimes the names of the different parts of the brain will give your brain a headache but it's manageable and you'd get around those weird names if you don't come from a medical background like meIt opened my eye brain eyes to many aspects of our lives and to the hidden social feature in each and every one of them how we are wired to be social from the day we're born how parents respond to their children's needs how we have a mind reading part of our brain to help us put ourselves in someone else's shoes the big shock that most of what we believe to be personal attributes and personal beliefs are actually input we took from the world we live in and claimed them to be ours the way we see our selves and what is the definition of the self even how our minds control our behaviour and thinking to ensure that we merge well into the society we live in how being a social being affects our daily work life how we can look at education from another perspective all these points and are really great to know about they will surely play a great part of my life ahead and how I look at things and how I treat people and maybe raise my kids