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The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains

Ative The Shallows explains how the Net is rerouting our neural pathways replacing the subtle mind of the book reader with the distracted mind of the screen watcher A gripping story of human transformation played out against a backdrop of technological upheaval The Shallows will forever alter the way we think about media and our min I call bullshitHow Esteban Got His Groove BackChannel surfing the other day I came across Highlander I’d never watched the movie all the way through even as a fanboy teenager those twenty four years ago when it was released and noticing that Christopher Lambert bears a striking resemblance to the guy in HBO’s Hung a serialized comedy drama about a male prostitute with an enormous dick for which my wife has an altogether unsettling appetite having on than one occasion blurted out Let’s see it as she watches found myself hypnotizedWhether or not it was a case of transference I will leave for you to decide but I was pulling for the bad guy to chop up the good guy I however like to think I found the bad guy much believable eual parts cynical ego centric and nihilistic what’s not to like? Take human nature splash it across the canvas of immortality and tell me who among us wouldn’t be morally bankrupt? But beyond my half baked and probably self serving philosophizing I was also annoyed by the good guy’s accent He’s supposedly from 16th Century Scotland has lived through the ages up to Ed Koch New York and he sounds like an ESL dropout Other immortals abound from his mentor Ramirez to the aforementioned villain the Kurgan and while they all hail from assorted times and places they all speak perfectly modern English What gives?Back in 1980s when Highlander was all the rage among the pimpled shut in set who would grow up to become today's neuroscientists and Goodreads reviewers popular scientific opinion maintained that the adult brain was incapable of much change having been fossilized andor habituated into near stasis by the nature andor the nurture of its formative years Our most celebrated organ was rendered impotent This theory satisfactorily explained why a guy who is almost five hundred years old sounds the same as he did when he was about twenty years old But neuroscience has come a long way in the intervening decades hanging its hat on neuroplasticity the proven capacity of the brain and central nervous system to grow and change throughout the whole of one's life If you'd like to see neuroplasticity at work just bind your dominant arm to your torso and see how uickly you are able to use your other arm for everything from driving to manipulating a remote control Or if you're a French accented Scotsman living in New York barring a beheading at the hands of your centuries old nemesis mingle with your cultural cousins and kiss that antiuated Clan MacLeod gibberish goodbyeYet Nicolas Carr makes the argument in The Shallows What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains that neuroplasticity can work against us too He feels that our working memory is being distracted and overtaxed by a superficial internet culture to the point that it is altering our brain chemistry for the worse affecting our capacity to synthesize information There are holes in his argument mostly of the anecdotal anxiety of the professional writing class and exaggerating variety for instance hyperlinks come in for much abuse but taken as a whole there is some cause for concern that the majority of the species is doomed to a type of uasi literacy evocative of a sort of technical writingMomento dystopia I believe the humanities oriented among us recognize this as the age old debate of will versus consciousness with will triumphant at lastBut all is not lost Carr concedes that there will always be a reading class of elites dedicated to the preservation of critical thought I for one am overjoyed at the prospect For too long have I toiled in the shadows of the robber barons of crass materialism skulkingly camouflaged as a bourgeois suburbanite Brothers and sisters rejoice The time of the Romantic Renaissance is at hand Fit me for something along the lines of a philosopher king and seat me on my Kurtz like throne fashioned from the skulls of MBA graduatesThere can be only one

free download Å eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ä Nicholas Carr

Important debates of our time As we enjoy the Net’s bounties are we sacrificing our ability to read and think deeply? Now Carr expands his argument into the most compelling exploration of the Internet’s intellectual and cultural conseuences yet published Weaving insights from philosophy neuroscience and history into a rich narr For Practical Summary Refer To How The Internet Is Tearing Your Focus Apart And 3 Ways to Rebuild It Do you get bored after reading just a couple of paragraphs from a text?Do you step into your room just to forget why you’re there?And do you constantly have this craving to jump off from a mentally demanding task to open up your Facebook or Instagram?If your answer to one the above is yes you are probably suffering from a shattered focusNeuroplasticity and How it Defines Our BehaviorsThink of your brain as a power grid with streets roads and highways Each time you think feel or act a combination of those pathways are lightened upSome of those pathways are traveled Those are our behavioral habits such as smoking or exercising or mental habits such as being constantly anxious about the future or being optimistic and seeing everything through a rosy lens Yes these are habits too and can be changedEach time you think a thought feel an emotion or act on a specific task you are strengthening their pathways in your brain Repeated enough those pathways become so strong that the corresponding thought emotion or action becomes automaticLet’s say you’ve had enough of constantly suffering the terrors of a vague future and the anxiety that comes with it and you want to change thatGiven that the antidote to anxiety is keeping your focus on the now you must strive to master your mind and keep it in the presentWhen you trying to do so you are building new neural pathways around that old dreadful pathway of constant anxietyInitially creating this new pathway reuires substantial effort and attention The same way that driving on an unpaved road is laborious than on a highway practicing this new habit would be difficult than simply giving in to the old habitBUT Each time you practice the new way of thinking you are making its pathway stronger and smoother Meanwhile the underlying pathway of the undesired habit is gradually beginning to decayThis process of rewiring your brain is called neuroplasticity In other words our brain is plastic and we can potentially modify its structureIt is crucial to note the word we use is plastic and not elastic This means that forming new pathways is arduous Once they’re formed with depth they can lock you in specific behaviors or thought patterns andOnce we wire a new neural circuit pathway into our brain we long to keep it active — Nicholas G CarrGiven the concept of neuroplasticity and its power let’s see how impulsive usage of the internet is rewiring our brain to forge a fragmented focusHow the Internet is Destroying Your FocusThe internet seizes our attention only to tear it into piecesBefore the proliferation of the media internet and now the social networks the primary medium for absorbing information was readingReading books for instance reuires a practice of thought one that demands sustained unbroken attention to a single static object It reuires you to place yourself at what T S Eliot in Four uartets would call “the still point of the turning world”Now look at the practice of reading books from the lens neuroplasticity When trying to retain our focus we are keeping the neural circuits pathways of focus active hence making them strongerUnfortunately this habit of reading took several massive hits with the shifts in the technology of information medium Initially the emergence of Radio TV and now the internet and social mediaBring to your mind the type of content you consume on the prevalent social media networks ie Facebook Instagram Snapchat Pinterest etcHow much time do you spend on every single content on those networks before you move on to the next?How much effort and focus do they reuire?And how often do you get engaged with these networks throughout a day?internet breaks focusShort Duration of Attention Spent on So many Attention SeekersFor me this realization was horrifyingWe are constantly jumping from one small fragment of content to the other One minute video on Instagram followed by less than 10 seconds view of other posts Jumping to Facebook to scroll through the feed and consuming nugget sized contentTake a step back and look at the big picture of the way you use the internetDo you see what’s happening?One minute here two minutes there jumping and jumping from task to task content to content and each jump endures in matters of minutes if not seconds This multitasking is an inherent product that comes with using the internet and has become a habit that drains and destroys our focusThis is how our attention span is breaking down We are rewiring our focus circuits and creating attention spans of trivial length and powerThis is the part where I’ve seen people and friends smile as they resonate with the examples of a broken focusYou start to read a book or a lengthy article; after reading a paragraph or so you feel a sense of restlessness or you feel bored and you crave to jump to another tab on your browser or move on to the next content in your feed or simply jump off to your phone and scour your InstagramThe you multitask the less deliberative you become; the less able to think and reason out a problem You become likely to rely on conventional ideas and solutions rather than challenging them with original lines of thought — Don TapscottThanx to neuroplasticity though rebuilding your focus is feasibleHow to Rebuild Your Focus1 Strengthen Your Focus the Natural WayPerhaps you have been to a gym or at least seen the scene where people pull up weightsWhen you repeat lifting up a weight which is heavy for you you will feel a slight pain in your muscleThe feel the pain or burning of the muscle because your cells are breaking downAfter that when you rest your body notices the broken down cellsThis tells your body that there are higher demands from itSo what happens next is that your body in addition to rebuilding those cells builds an extra layer of cells atop them as well and provides you with muscle power This is why bodies grow in size after a period of working outThis process is analogous to rebuilding focus The practical point is thisBlueprint Next time that you start to read a book or text and the boredom monster creeps in do not give in to it Instead try to at least keep on reading for a couple of minutes These extra couple of minutes are precisely where you are stretching you focus and making it strongerFor the rest of the techniues on increasing focus refer toHow The Internet Is Tearing Your Focus Apart And 3 Ways to Rebuild Itپیشنهاد به همه به خصوص نسلی که اینترنت بخش بزرگی از زندگیشون هستموضوع این کتاب بسیار خوب، تاثیر درگیری زیاد با اینترنت و اثرات ساختار اون بر روی مغز و نوع تفکر انسان رو بررسی می کنهبررسی و گزیده هانکته جالب در مورد این کتاب فکر می کنم این بود که حدود یک سوم ابتدایی کتاب صرف ساخت و پرداخت مقدمه ای می شه که قرار هست در ادامه کتاب در خصوص اثرات اینترت بر مغز رو بررسی کنه این مقدمات شامل بررسی سیر تکامل پیدایش خط، صنعت چاپ، کتاب و تاثیراتشون بر تفکر هست تا یکی از مهمترین ویژگی های مغز یعنی اثر پلاستیکیپلاستیک بودن مغز به این معنی که ساختار مغز که در نهایت تعیین کننده رفتار و تصمیم های ما هست کاملا قابل تغییر هست و پارادوکس جالبی اینه که وقتی این تغییرات شکل بگیره به نوعی ما بنده اون و گرفتار اون ساختار می شیمOnce we wire a new neural circuit into our brain we long to keep it active در بررسی تاریخچه پیدایش خط، و در نتیجه اون کتاب خواندن مردم، نویسنده طبق بررسی های جامعی که انجام داده به این نکته مهم اشاره می کنه که کتاب خوندن یک عمل خطی بوده و هست که از قدیم افراد کتاب خوان برای فهم مطالب تمرکز زیاد و بدون حواس پرتی رو تجربه می کردند که این موضوع باعث فهم بهتر مطالب و به خاطر سپاری قوی تر اون ها می شد میوه شیرین فهم و انباشت این اطلاعات در ذهن هم البته نوآوری، خلاقیت بوده است و مهمتر از اون اینکه عادت کتاب خونی باعث می شد افراد به یک ذهن با تمرکز بالا و بینش قوی تر مجهز بشنTo read a book was to practice an unnatural process of thought one that demanded sustained unbroken attention to a single static object It reuired readers to place themselves at what T S Eliot in Four uartets would call “the still point of the turning world”نکته مهم در استفاده از هر چیزی اینه که بعد از استفاده مداوم، به چه آدمی تبدیل می شیمDeep reading is by no means a passive exercise the reader becomes the bookاولین موجی که به این عادت خوب ضربه زد، ظهور رسانه های الکتریکی نظیر رادیو و تلوزیون بود اما این رسانه ها در انتقال متن ضعیف بودن و نقطه قوتشون ارسال صدا و تصویر بود پس در زمینه نوشتار نتونست به طور کامل جایگزین کتاب بشه مشکل اساسی که اینترنت و نحوه استفاده از اون عامل اصلیش هست، کم کردن زمان تمرکز ما بر روی مطالب هست اگر دقت کنید اغلب مطالب روزانه به خصوص موجود در شبکه های اجتماعی، کوتاه و گذرا هستن این کوتاهی، باطبع تمرکز کمتری رو می طلبه و فشار کمتری رو بر روی ذهن می گذاره نتیجه این فرآیند چیزی نیست جز تنبل شدن ذهن به خصوص در مواجه با مطابی که فهمشون نیازمند تمرکز و صرف وقت و تفکر هست AS PEOPLE’S MINDS become attuned to the crazy uilt of Web content media companies have to adapt to the audience’s new expectations Many producers are chopping up their products to fit the shorter attention spans of online consumersWhen access to information is easy we tend to favor the short the sweet and the bittyپیام کلیدی و شاید ترسناک کتاببه نظر من مهم ترین بخش کتاب اینجا بود که در خصوص اینترنت بر اساس تحقیقات، نویسنده اشاره می کنه که اینترنت دقیقا همه محرک های اساسی لازم برای ایجاد تغییرات سریع و ماندگار در مدارهای عصبی مغز از جمله محرک هاش شناختی، تکرار، پر شدت، تعاملی و اعتیادآور بودن را دارد از طرف دیگر اینترت به دلیل ساختا و محتوا، مشوق تفکر پراکنده، یادگیری سطحی، و خواندن سرسری با عجله هست که در بلند مدت کاربران رو تبدیل می کنه افرادی کم حوصله که مشتاق این دست از مطالب و فراری از مفاهیم طولانی و عمیق تر هستندTry reading a book while doing a crossword puzzle; that's the intellectual environment of the internet اشکالهایی که به کتاب وارد هست یکم طولانی بودن مقدمات و همچنین تکرارهای بیش از حد مطالب به زبان های دیگر در بخش های مختلف بود و گاهی هم به نظر انسجام مطالب به خصوص در انتهای کتاب از بین می رفتدر کل کتابی هست که تحقیق بسیاری برای نگارشش شده و فکر می کنم همه از خوندنش بسیار سود خواهند برد Selected Synopses1 Navigating the Web reuires a particularly intensive form of mental multitasking Inaddition to flooding our working memory with information the juggling imposes whatbrain scientists call “switching costs” on our cognition Every time we shift ourattention our brain has to reorient itself further taxing our mental resources2 The you multitask the less deliberative you become; the less able to think and reason out a problem” You become he argues likely to rely on conventional ideas and solutions rather than challenging them with original lines of thought3 What we’re doing when we multitask “is learning to be skillful at a superficial level” The Roman philosopher Seneca may have put it best two thousand years ago “To be everywhere is to be nowhere”4 Erasmus’s recommendation that every reader keep a notebook of memorable uotations was widely and enthusiastically followed Such notebooks which came to be called “commonplace books” or just “commonplaces” became fixtures of Renaissance schooling Every student kept one By the seventeenth century their use had spread beyond the schoolhouse Commonplaces were viewed as necessary tools for the cultivation of an educated mind In 1623 Francis Bacon observed that “there can hardly be anything useful” as “a sound help for the memory” than “a good and learned Digest of Common Places” By aiding the recording of written works in memory he wrote a well maintained commonplace “supplies matter to invention” Through the eighteenth century according to American University linguistics professor Naomi Baron “a gentleman’s commonplace book” served “both as a vehicle for and a chronicle of his intellectual development5 Once we bring an explicit long term memory back into working memory it becomes a short term memory again6 The Web places pressure on our working memory not only diverting resources from our higher reasoning faculties but obstructing the consolidation of long term memories and the development of schemas The calculator a powerful but highly specialized tool turned out to be an aid to memory The Web is a technology of forgetfulness7 What determines what we remember and what we forget? The key to memory consolidation is attentiveness Storing explicit memories and eually important forming connections between them reuires strong mental concentration amplified by repetition or by intense intellectual or emotional engagement The sharper the attention the sharper the memory “For a memory to persist” writes Kandel “the incoming information must be thoroughly and deeply processed This is accomplished by attending to the information and associating it meaningfully and systematically withknowledge already well established in memory8 How is the way we think changing? This is the uestion we shoud be asking both of ourselves and of our children

Nicholas Carr ä 7 free download

The best selling author of The Big Switch returns with an explosive look at technology’s effect on the mind “Is Google making us stupid?” When Nicholas Carr posed that uestion in a celebrated Atlantic Monthly cover story he tapped into a well of anxiety about how the Internet is changing us He also crystallized one of the most I got this email What the hell I thought I could do with a bigger penis So I replied to the email Sent them money What a mistake The process worked – only too well Now I couldn’t leave the house any no clothes were bulky enough I did not wish to suffer the indignity of being pursued down the street by insulting children so I had to resign from my job I was in a real pickle Fortunately I saw an ad on the internet saying that I could make £2500 per month tax free from the privacy of my bedroom by doing absolutely nothing It seemed too good to be true but I thought what the hell You won’t believe me but that turned out to be true too so I didn't need a job and I could get all my groceries delivered But I needed money than that to pay for the reverse operation I wanted my old penis back As luck would have it I got another email from a bank manager in Benin which is in West Africa I won’t bore you with the details but it was a relatively simple banking transaction I really don’t know why the Bank of West Africa guys couldn’t do it for themselves but anyway what do I care – I’m now rich After the operation it’s going to be great I’ll definitely be dating some of these hot women who live one third of a mile away from my very house and are waiting for me to contact them – I see their alluring pictures wherever I go on the internet I must live in a really great area for hot women

  • Hardcover
  • 276
  • The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains
  • Nicholas Carr
  • English
  • 18 November 2020
  • 9780393072228

About the Author: Nicholas Carr

Nicholas Carr is the author of the Pulitzer What the PDF ✓ Prize finalist The Shallows the best selling The Big Switch and Does IT Matter? His acclaimed new book The The Shallows: PDF/EPUB or Glass Cage Automation and Us examines the personal and social conseuences of our ever growing dependence on computers and software Former executive editor of the Harvard Business Review Shallows: What the Kindle Ï he has written for The Atlantic New York Times Wall.



10 thoughts on “The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains

  1. says:

    For the last few years I've noticed that I seem to have developed a form of ADD This was always the most apparent during the first few weeks of summer vacation when I would start and stop projects with lightning speed when I couldn't sit still to read a book or watch a movie all the way through when I couldn't clean my house all in one day when I couldn't keep my mind on just one train of thought As someone who had always lived for structure who craved the routine and the predictable who always finished one task completely and thoroughly before moving on to another this was uite alarming to me I blamed teaching My mind had adapted to the need to deliver content monitor student behavior answer uestions pass out papers remind everyone for the umpteenth time that classwork is to be turned in to the orange basket run the PowerPoint avoid saying anything that might get me fired “do not tell little Johnny that there is such a thing as a stupid uestion and he just asked it” and the need to do so all at once Turns out there may be something to my theory And it turns out that this manner of thinking the need to hyper multitask may be exacerbated by the rise of technology as a conduit to information It’s comforting to know that if I’m becoming stupid it’s not entirely my faultIn The Shallows Nicholas Carr uestions the impact technology has upon our lives What’s most important here is that Carr is in no way advocating a return to the pre technology era He admits that much good has been done and will be done by technology and he fesses up to loving and relying on technology himself However he examines the idea of neuroplasticity—the idea that the brain rewires itself to adapt to the stimuli it encounters During the age of the book the brain had to rewire itself to be able to focus for long periods of time upon text and to think about that text deeply This didn’t happen all at once but was accelerated as books became readily available to a widely educated public The mind became accustomed to taking in information intensely if not rapidly as the brain had time to ruminate on and process the information it encountered The result was a deep thinking literate individual People became experts in specific areas and the keepers of knowledge associated with their particular field of specialty They were responsible for filtering critiuing and judging the uality of new knowledge which had to be “vetted” before it could be accepted as accurate and true So what have we sacrificed in this age of point and click? We’re losing the idea of specialization which is one of the frightening aspects to me Any idiot with access to a keyboard and an Internet connection can post anything they want online and it’s accepted as truth A society that becomes accustomed to finding any and all information online may never learn anything deeply and what will happen when Skynet becomes self aware takes over and the machines rise against us eh? Instead people will have little pockets of knowledge supplemented by what they can find online Also I have to wonder how many innovations and ideas were serendipitously created when answers weren’t easy to find When an answer can be found through a uick web search the deep thinking that may lead to phenomenal breakthroughs and intense creativity may be forfeited In addition our attention spans are suffering We bounce from hyperlink to hyperlink chasing new pieces of information which we scan uickly and because we read over it so uickly it’s never stored in our long term memory The next time we need that information we’ll have to log back on and find it again instead of relying on our ability to recall itCarr’s book is not the ramblings of an ill informed radical This book is well researched and Carr traces how the human brain has evolved throughout history including pre technology to show that neuroplasticity has allowed us to adapt to our ever changing environments There’s hard science here as well If you don’t agree with Carr’s thesis by the end there’s no denying that he's done his homework I love technology and I think Nicholas Carr does too Carr’s book is not an indictment of technology but rather a call for the public to be cognizant of the ways in which technology is affecting us—both the good and the bad Our society has so uickly and readily embraced technology that we haven’t thought about the potential long term tradeoffs When we think about it and realize “Hey wait a minute This food I’ve planted on Farmville—I can’t eat one damn bit of it” then we might become responsible about how and when we use technology and maybe we’ll go plant a garden in the backyard I know that I for one have started logging off freuently and making sure that the time I do spend online is enriching my life in some way Cross posted at This Insignificant Cinder and at Shelf Inflicted

  2. says:

    Everyone's talking about this book and I felt I had to check it out I agree it's definitely worth reading In particular it drove home effectively than anything else I've seen just how addictive the Internet is As he says you don't want to admit to yourself how much you crave internet stimulation and how freuently you check mail SMSes Goodreads updates and similar inputs I immediately turned off all of these to see what would happen; I'm afraid to say that I was very much productive than usual today I think I will have to change my work habits in this direction and make sure that things stay switched off a large part of the time Reminding me that I'm an addict was far from being the only thing to like here I didn't buy his whole analysis but I thought a lot of it was insightful I had not properly appreciated just how the market pressures worked Google and other service providers get paid per click so they are motivated to make you click as much as possible In other words they need to be as distracting as possible and they are methodical about tuning their software to achieve that goal Nice for them not so nice for the surfer A related fact which I hadn't seen before is that studies show hyperlinks make text harder to understand not easier The cognitive load of deciding whether or not to click is larger than you intuitively think So people skim hypertext and retain less of the content A lot of the book explores the cognitive mechanisms that underly internet addiction He uotes Marshall McLuhan's well known phrase the medium is the message In this case the thing we need to be aware of is that the delivery mechanism ie the internet itself is in many ways important than the content it's delivering We aren't getting hooked on the content; we're getting hooked on the activities of clicking surfing and receiving social networking messages He uotes studies on neuroplasticity showing how the brain rewires itself much uickly than people used to think when it's confronted with new stimuli One particularly striking experiment measured brain activation as people surfed the web contrasting experienced surfers with newbies Initially the brain activation patterns were uite different but after only a few hours the novices had started to look like the long time users The changes start earlyAnother section I liked made comparisons with earlier innovations in the field of information technology He considers the invention of writing Sumeria and Ancient Egypt the alphabet Ancient Greece and printing Gutenberg arguing that all of these resulted in enormous changes to people's cognitive makeup There's a nice passage from one of Socrates's dialogues where they're discussing the downside of writing; they wonder whether it's destroying people's ability to appreciate poetry and fooling them into believing that they know a work of literature when they've not actually had to memorize it But as he says these criticisms turned out to be incorrect Writing led to a set of habits centered around the practice of silent reading which crystallized into the new phenomenon of the literary mind In some of the most passionately felt pages of the book he explains his belief that this uiet contemplative way of being immersion in the text is one of the cornerstones of Western civilization and that the internet is in danger of destroying it It's both moving and ingenious but I did feel in a way that he was arguing against himself As he admits his criticisms of the internet are very similar to the Ancient Greeks' criticisms of writing which turned out to be a major leap forward The internet has only just been born and it's normal to feel threatened by technology one hasn't yet learned to understand It seems to me that the analogy with writing is a good one Once we're in control of this new medium it's uite plausible that we may see a similar leap in human thought Another thing that made me reluctant to accept everything he said at face value was that when I was able to check him against my own specialist knowledge it didn't always match up A flagrant example was his discussion of the way writing conventions changed during the Middle Ages which he returned to than once He says that there used to be no spaces between words and word order was free so reading was like problem solving and people couldn't do it easily then written language changed in the direction of spaces and fixed word order people could read far uickly and that affected their whole mind set I am dubious about this For example Japanese has never been written with spaces between words and Japanese word order is free but Japanese people are exceptionally literate Also going back to Medieval Europe it's true that Latin moved towards adopting a rigid word order but that was much earlier and I didn't think it was reasonable to connect things here So my feeling is that he is sometimes twisting the facts to fit his hypothesis and one should take him with a pinch of salt But even with these reservations I thought he was very good And now that I've posted this review I'm going to log out of Goodreads and do something else instead of hanging around as usual waiting for my next social networking hit Thank you Mr Carr

  3. says:

    I got this email What the hell I thought I could do with a bigger penis So I replied to the email Sent them money What a mistake The process worked – only too well Now I couldn’t leave the house any no clothes were bulky enough I did not wish to suffer the indignity of being pursued down the street by insulting children so I had to resign from my job I was in a real pickle Fortunately I saw an ad on the internet saying that I could make £2500 per month tax free from the privacy of my bedroom by doing absolutely nothing It seemed too good to be true but I thought what the hell You won’t believe me but that turned out to be true too so I didn't need a job and I could get all my groceries delivered But I needed money than that to pay for the reverse operation I wanted my old penis back As luck would have it I got another email from a bank manager in Benin which is in West Africa I won’t bore you with the details but it was a relatively simple banking transaction I really don’t know why the Bank of West Africa guys couldn’t do it for themselves but anyway what do I care – I’m now rich After the operation it’s going to be great I’ll definitely be dating some of these hot women who live one third of a mile away from my very house and are waiting for me to contact them – I see their alluring pictures wherever I go on the internet I must live in a really great area for hot women

  4. says:

    In this fascinating informative book Carr argues that the internet has not only affected how society communicates and works but that how our actual brains work is being has been changed by contemporary modes of communication He delves into the history of research into brain function to make a case that similar biological changes occurred with prior technological breakthroughs such as the typewriter He cites a wealth of studies that dispel the notion of the brain as set in stone once adulthood is reached The brain is plastic All our neural circuitry can be modified and it adapts to each new technology not with slow genetic modification but using inherent neurological plasticity to function in new ways Nicholas Carr image from his siteNext he follows the trail of language from cuneiform through wax tablets to papyrus and actual pages from Gutenberg to today from the radio to television from Turing to the iPhone It is a fast paced and information rich journeyThe big guns come out in chapter 7 The Juggler’s Brain where Carr argues forcefully that the medium of the internet is by design an engine of distraction and it has changed how we read and how we think The change may have some benefits but the cost is uite high particularly in reducing our ability to think reflectively I found this chapter particularly compellingA later chapter reports on Google’s megalomaniacal plan to put all books in human history into a single database that Google will control All that’s lacking is a smug pinkie ringed fat guy sitting in his secret lair stroking a fluffy white cat Chapter nine takes on the mechanistic view of the human brain as a sort of computer In particular Carr takes issue with the view of long term memory as being the euivalent of a hard drive used solely to hold information It turns out that unlike the on off character of digital memory human memory is not so absolute Information observation and experience go through several steps before finding their way to long term memory and even when a memory or bit of information is recalled it finds its way back into long term memory with the added color and texture of the time and circumstances of its recollection This is fascinating stuff but I think he goes a bit too far in his dismissal of the computer as a model for human brainworks Consider that he fully embraces a concept of “working memory” as a temporary workplace in which new memory is mixed with retrieved memory to constitute the bulk of what we consider active consciousness The similarity to RAM is just too obvious to ignore uibble aside this is a riveting and informative tale with obvious implications for our culture that is if you can pay attention to reading it long enough for the lessons to sink inTbe 10th anniversary edition of the book with new material is out March 3 2020EXTRA STUFFLinks to the author’s Personal Twitter and Instagram pages and his blogFebruary 28 2017 The Guardian How Technology Gets Us Hooked by Adam Alter this focuses on game design but the concepts apply across the mediumJuly 1 2020 Vox How technology literally changes our brains Ezra Klein interviews Carr fascinating stuffUOTESP 6 As McLuhan suggested media aren’t just channels of information They supply the stuff of thought but they shape the process of thought And what the Net seems to be doing is chipping away my Carr’s capacity for concentration and contemplation P 115 – As revolutionary as it may be the Net is best understood as the latest in a long series of tools that have helped mold the human mind P 140 – Jordan Grafman head of the cognitive neuroscience unit at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke explains that the constant shifting of our attention when we’re online may make our brains nimble when it comes to multitasking but improving our ability to multitask actually hampers our ability to think deeply and creatively “Does optimizing for multitasking result in better functioning—that is creativity inventiveness productiveness? The answer is in cases than not no” says Grafman “The you multitask the less deliberative you become; the less able to think and reason out a problem” You become he argues likely to rely on conventional ideas and solutions rather than challenging them with original lines of thought

  5. says:

    The Shallows What the Internet is doing to our brains 2012 Nicholas CarrThe Shallows What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains published in the United Kingdom as The Shallows How the Internet Is Changing the Way We Think Read and Remember is a 2010 book by the American journalist Nicholas G Carr The book expands on the themes first raised in Is Google Making Us Stupid? Carr's 2008 essay in The Atlantic and explores the effects of the Internet on the brain The book claims research shows online reading yields lower comprehension than reading a printed page The Shallows was a finalist for the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfictionتاریخ نخستین خوانش هشتم ماه دسامبر سال 2014میلادیعنوان کم‌ عمق‌ ها اینترنت با مغز ما چه می‌کند؟ نویسنده نیکلای کار؛ مترجم امیر سپهرام؛ تهران؛ مازیار، 1393؛ در 248ص؛ شابک 9786006043357؛ موضوع اینترنت از نویسندگان امریکایی سده 21مفهرست بخشهای کتاب سگ نگهبان و دزد؛ من و هال؛ مسیرهای مجازی؛ گریزی به آنچه که مغز می‌اندیشد وقتی به خود می‌اندیشد؛ ابزارهای مغز؛ ژرفنای صفحه؛ گریزی به ؛ رسانه‌ ای با عمومی‌ ترین ماهیت؛ تصویر واقعی یک کتاب؛ مغز یک تردست؛ کلیسای گوگل؛ جستجو، حافظه؛ گریزی به نگارش این کتاب؛ چیزی مثل من؛نویسنده در کتاب کم‌ عمق‌ ها اینترنت با مغز ما چه می‌کند؛ تاثیر فناوری اینترنت، نشر اینترنتی و کتاب‌خوانی دیجیتال به ویژه وب‌خوانی را از زوایای گوناگون بررسی کرده است؛ در کتاب به اجمال و با زبانی همه‌ فهم، به ساختار و کارکرد مغز پرداخته، و با مرور تاریخچه فناوری‌های فکری، و به ویژه کتاب و کتاب‌خوانی، و همچنین اشاره به کارکرد اینترنت، و موتورهای جستجو، تاثیر جابجایی کتاب از رسانه ی کاغذی، به رسانه ی دیجیتال، و نشر اینترنتی، و وب، و راه و رسم کتاب‌خوانی مردم، مورد بحث قرار گرفته است؛ نویسنده برآیند این همه را، گرایش انسان عصر نوین، به سطحی‌ خوانی، و دوری‌ از ژرف‌ خوانی و غرق شدن در متن نوشتار، می‌داند؛ و عادت همگان، به خوانش تند، و گذرای سرخط‌ها، و نوشته‌ های وبلاگ‌ها را، شاهدی بر این مدعای خویش می‌آورد؛ استنتاج نهایی کتاب این است، که با فراگیر، و جایگیر شدن این شیوه از خوانش، اطلاعات بشر افزایش، ولی هوش او کاهش خواهد یافت؛ و مغز بیشتر به انباره ی فهرستی از دانسته‌ ها، بدل خواهد شد؛ در چنین وضعیتی، مغز نمی‌تواند با ترکیب دانسته‌ ها، ایده‌ های نو بیافریند، و هوش بشر با تعریفی که امروز از آن داریم کم خواهد شدتاریخ بهنگام رسانی 10071399هجری خورشیدی؛ ا شربیانی

  6. says:

    For Practical Summary Refer To How The Internet Is Tearing Your Focus Apart And 3 Ways to Rebuild It Do you get bored after reading just a couple of paragraphs from a text?Do you step into your room just to forget why you’re there?And do you constantly have this craving to jump off from a mentally demanding task to open up your Facebook or Instagram?If your answer to one the above is yes you are probably suffering from a shattered focusNeuroplasticity and How it Defines Our BehaviorsThink of your brain as a power grid with streets roads and highways Each time you think feel or act a combination of those pathways are lightened upSome of those pathways are traveled Those are our behavioral habits such as smoking or exercising or mental habits such as being constantly anxious about the future or being optimistic and seeing everything through a rosy lens Yes these are habits too and can be changedEach time you think a thought feel an emotion or act on a specific task you are strengthening their pathways in your brain Repeated enough those pathways become so strong that the corresponding thought emotion or action becomes automaticLet’s say you’ve had enough of constantly suffering the terrors of a vague future and the anxiety that comes with it and you want to change thatGiven that the antidote to anxiety is keeping your focus on the now you must strive to master your mind and keep it in the presentWhen you trying to do so you are building new neural pathways around that old dreadful pathway of constant anxietyInitially creating this new pathway reuires substantial effort and attention The same way that driving on an unpaved road is laborious than on a highway practicing this new habit would be difficult than simply giving in to the old habitBUT Each time you practice the new way of thinking you are making its pathway stronger and smoother Meanwhile the underlying pathway of the undesired habit is gradually beginning to decayThis process of rewiring your brain is called neuroplasticity In other words our brain is plastic and we can potentially modify its structureIt is crucial to note the word we use is plastic and not elastic This means that forming new pathways is arduous Once they’re formed with depth they can lock you in specific behaviors or thought patterns andOnce we wire a new neural circuit pathway into our brain we long to keep it active — Nicholas G CarrGiven the concept of neuroplasticity and its power let’s see how impulsive usage of the internet is rewiring our brain to forge a fragmented focusHow the Internet is Destroying Your FocusThe internet seizes our attention only to tear it into piecesBefore the proliferation of the media internet and now the social networks the primary medium for absorbing information was readingReading books for instance reuires a practice of thought one that demands sustained unbroken attention to a single static object It reuires you to place yourself at what T S Eliot in Four uartets would call “the still point of the turning world”Now look at the practice of reading books from the lens neuroplasticity When trying to retain our focus we are keeping the neural circuits pathways of focus active hence making them strongerUnfortunately this habit of reading took several massive hits with the shifts in the technology of information medium Initially the emergence of Radio TV and now the internet and social mediaBring to your mind the type of content you consume on the prevalent social media networks ie Facebook Instagram Snapchat Pinterest etcHow much time do you spend on every single content on those networks before you move on to the next?How much effort and focus do they reuire?And how often do you get engaged with these networks throughout a day?internet breaks focusShort Duration of Attention Spent on So many Attention SeekersFor me this realization was horrifyingWe are constantly jumping from one small fragment of content to the other One minute video on Instagram followed by less than 10 seconds view of other posts Jumping to Facebook to scroll through the feed and consuming nugget sized contentTake a step back and look at the big picture of the way you use the internetDo you see what’s happening?One minute here two minutes there jumping and jumping from task to task content to content and each jump endures in matters of minutes if not seconds This multitasking is an inherent product that comes with using the internet and has become a habit that drains and destroys our focusThis is how our attention span is breaking down We are rewiring our focus circuits and creating attention spans of trivial length and powerThis is the part where I’ve seen people and friends smile as they resonate with the examples of a broken focusYou start to read a book or a lengthy article; after reading a paragraph or so you feel a sense of restlessness or you feel bored and you crave to jump to another tab on your browser or move on to the next content in your feed or simply jump off to your phone and scour your InstagramThe you multitask the less deliberative you become; the less able to think and reason out a problem You become likely to rely on conventional ideas and solutions rather than challenging them with original lines of thought — Don TapscottThanx to neuroplasticity though rebuilding your focus is feasibleHow to Rebuild Your Focus1 Strengthen Your Focus the Natural WayPerhaps you have been to a gym or at least seen the scene where people pull up weightsWhen you repeat lifting up a weight which is heavy for you you will feel a slight pain in your muscleThe feel the pain or burning of the muscle because your cells are breaking downAfter that when you rest your body notices the broken down cellsThis tells your body that there are higher demands from itSo what happens next is that your body in addition to rebuilding those cells builds an extra layer of cells atop them as well and provides you with muscle power This is why bodies grow in size after a period of working outThis process is analogous to rebuilding focus The practical point is thisBlueprint Next time that you start to read a book or text and the boredom monster creeps in do not give in to it Instead try to at least keep on reading for a couple of minutes These extra couple of minutes are precisely where you are stretching you focus and making it strongerFor the rest of the techniues on increasing focus refer toHow The Internet Is Tearing Your Focus Apart And 3 Ways to Rebuild Itپیشنهاد به همه به خصوص نسلی که اینترنت بخش بزرگی از زندگیشون هستموضوع این کتاب بسیار خوب، تاثیر درگیری زیاد با اینترنت و اثرات ساختار اون بر روی مغز و نوع تفکر انسان رو بررسی می کنهبررسی و گزیده هانکته جالب در مورد این کتاب فکر می کنم این بود که حدود یک سوم ابتدایی کتاب صرف ساخت و پرداخت مقدمه ای می شه که قرار هست در ادامه کتاب در خصوص اثرات اینترت بر مغز رو بررسی کنه این مقدمات شامل بررسی سیر تکامل پیدایش خط، صنعت چاپ، کتاب و تاثیراتشون بر تفکر هست تا یکی از مهمترین ویژگی های مغز یعنی اثر پلاستیکیپلاستیک بودن مغز به این معنی که ساختار مغز که در نهایت تعیین کننده رفتار و تصمیم های ما هست کاملا قابل تغییر هست و پارادوکس جالبی اینه که وقتی این تغییرات شکل بگیره به نوعی ما بنده اون و گرفتار اون ساختار می شیمOnce we wire a new neural circuit into our brain we long to keep it active در بررسی تاریخچه پیدایش خط، و در نتیجه اون کتاب خواندن مردم، نویسنده طبق بررسی های جامعی که انجام داده به این نکته مهم اشاره می کنه که کتاب خوندن یک عمل خطی بوده و هست که از قدیم افراد کتاب خوان برای فهم مطالب تمرکز زیاد و بدون حواس پرتی رو تجربه می کردند که این موضوع باعث فهم بهتر مطالب و به خاطر سپاری قوی تر اون ها می شد میوه شیرین فهم و انباشت این اطلاعات در ذهن هم البته نوآوری، خلاقیت بوده است و مهمتر از اون اینکه عادت کتاب خونی باعث می شد افراد به یک ذهن با تمرکز بالا و بینش قوی تر مجهز بشنTo read a book was to practice an unnatural process of thought one that demanded sustained unbroken attention to a single static object It reuired readers to place themselves at what T S Eliot in Four uartets would call “the still point of the turning world”نکته مهم در استفاده از هر چیزی اینه که بعد از استفاده مداوم، به چه آدمی تبدیل می شیمDeep reading is by no means a passive exercise the reader becomes the bookاولین موجی که به این عادت خوب ضربه زد، ظهور رسانه های الکتریکی نظیر رادیو و تلوزیون بود اما این رسانه ها در انتقال متن ضعیف بودن و نقطه قوتشون ارسال صدا و تصویر بود پس در زمینه نوشتار نتونست به طور کامل جایگزین کتاب بشه مشکل اساسی که اینترنت و نحوه استفاده از اون عامل اصلیش هست، کم کردن زمان تمرکز ما بر روی مطالب هست اگر دقت کنید اغلب مطالب روزانه به خصوص موجود در شبکه های اجتماعی، کوتاه و گذرا هستن این کوتاهی، باطبع تمرکز کمتری رو می طلبه و فشار کمتری رو بر روی ذهن می گذاره نتیجه این فرآیند چیزی نیست جز تنبل شدن ذهن به خصوص در مواجه با مطابی که فهمشون نیازمند تمرکز و صرف وقت و تفکر هست AS PEOPLE’S MINDS become attuned to the crazy uilt of Web content media companies have to adapt to the audience’s new expectations Many producers are chopping up their products to fit the shorter attention spans of online consumersWhen access to information is easy we tend to favor the short the sweet and the bittyپیام کلیدی و شاید ترسناک کتاببه نظر من مهم ترین بخش کتاب اینجا بود که در خصوص اینترنت بر اساس تحقیقات، نویسنده اشاره می کنه که اینترنت دقیقا همه محرک های اساسی لازم برای ایجاد تغییرات سریع و ماندگار در مدارهای عصبی مغز از جمله محرک هاش شناختی، تکرار، پر شدت، تعاملی و اعتیادآور بودن را دارد از طرف دیگر اینترت به دلیل ساختا و محتوا، مشوق تفکر پراکنده، یادگیری سطحی، و خواندن سرسری با عجله هست که در بلند مدت کاربران رو تبدیل می کنه افرادی کم حوصله که مشتاق این دست از مطالب و فراری از مفاهیم طولانی و عمیق تر هستندTry reading a book while doing a crossword puzzle; that's the intellectual environment of the internet اشکالهایی که به کتاب وارد هست یکم طولانی بودن مقدمات و همچنین تکرارهای بیش از حد مطالب به زبان های دیگر در بخش های مختلف بود و گاهی هم به نظر انسجام مطالب به خصوص در انتهای کتاب از بین می رفتدر کل کتابی هست که تحقیق بسیاری برای نگارشش شده و فکر می کنم همه از خوندنش بسیار سود خواهند برد Selected Synopses1 Navigating the Web reuires a particularly intensive form of mental multitasking Inaddition to flooding our working memory with information the juggling imposes whatbrain scientists call “switching costs” on our cognition Every time we shift ourattention our brain has to reorient itself further taxing our mental resources2 The you multitask the less deliberative you become; the less able to think and reason out a problem” You become he argues likely to rely on conventional ideas and solutions rather than challenging them with original lines of thought3 What we’re doing when we multitask “is learning to be skillful at a superficial level” The Roman philosopher Seneca may have put it best two thousand years ago “To be everywhere is to be nowhere”4 Erasmus’s recommendation that every reader keep a notebook of memorable uotations was widely and enthusiastically followed Such notebooks which came to be called “commonplace books” or just “commonplaces” became fixtures of Renaissance schooling Every student kept one By the seventeenth century their use had spread beyond the schoolhouse Commonplaces were viewed as necessary tools for the cultivation of an educated mind In 1623 Francis Bacon observed that “there can hardly be anything useful” as “a sound help for the memory” than “a good and learned Digest of Common Places” By aiding the recording of written works in memory he wrote a well maintained commonplace “supplies matter to invention” Through the eighteenth century according to American University linguistics professor Naomi Baron “a gentleman’s commonplace book” served “both as a vehicle for and a chronicle of his intellectual development5 Once we bring an explicit long term memory back into working memory it becomes a short term memory again6 The Web places pressure on our working memory not only diverting resources from our higher reasoning faculties but obstructing the consolidation of long term memories and the development of schemas The calculator a powerful but highly specialized tool turned out to be an aid to memory The Web is a technology of forgetfulness7 What determines what we remember and what we forget? The key to memory consolidation is attentiveness Storing explicit memories and eually important forming connections between them reuires strong mental concentration amplified by repetition or by intense intellectual or emotional engagement The sharper the attention the sharper the memory “For a memory to persist” writes Kandel “the incoming information must be thoroughly and deeply processed This is accomplished by attending to the information and associating it meaningfully and systematically withknowledge already well established in memory8 How is the way we think changing? This is the uestion we shoud be asking both of ourselves and of our children

  7. says:

    I call bullshitHow Esteban Got His Groove BackChannel surfing the other day I came across Highlander I’d never watched the movie all the way through even as a fanboy teenager those twenty four years ago when it was released and noticing that Christopher Lambert bears a striking resemblance to the guy in HBO’s Hung a serialized comedy drama about a male prostitute with an enormous dick for which my wife has an altogether unsettling appetite having on than one occasion blurted out Let’s see it as she watches found myself hypnotizedWhether or not it was a case of transference I will leave for you to decide but I was pulling for the bad guy to chop up the good guy I however like to think I found the bad guy much believable eual parts cynical ego centric and nihilistic what’s not to like? Take human nature splash it across the canvas of immortality and tell me who among us wouldn’t be morally bankrupt? But beyond my half baked and probably self serving philosophizing I was also annoyed by the good guy’s accent He’s supposedly from 16th Century Scotland has lived through the ages up to Ed Koch New York and he sounds like an ESL dropout Other immortals abound from his mentor Ramirez to the aforementioned villain the Kurgan and while they all hail from assorted times and places they all speak perfectly modern English What gives?Back in 1980s when Highlander was all the rage among the pimpled shut in set who would grow up to become today's neuroscientists and Goodreads reviewers popular scientific opinion maintained that the adult brain was incapable of much change having been fossilized andor habituated into near stasis by the nature andor the nurture of its formative years Our most celebrated organ was rendered impotent This theory satisfactorily explained why a guy who is almost five hundred years old sounds the same as he did when he was about twenty years old But neuroscience has come a long way in the intervening decades hanging its hat on neuroplasticity the proven capacity of the brain and central nervous system to grow and change throughout the whole of one's life If you'd like to see neuroplasticity at work just bind your dominant arm to your torso and see how uickly you are able to use your other arm for everything from driving to manipulating a remote control Or if you're a French accented Scotsman living in New York barring a beheading at the hands of your centuries old nemesis mingle with your cultural cousins and kiss that antiuated Clan MacLeod gibberish goodbyeYet Nicolas Carr makes the argument in The Shallows What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains that neuroplasticity can work against us too He feels that our working memory is being distracted and overtaxed by a superficial internet culture to the point that it is altering our brain chemistry for the worse affecting our capacity to synthesize information There are holes in his argument mostly of the anecdotal anxiety of the professional writing class and exaggerating variety for instance hyperlinks come in for much abuse but taken as a whole there is some cause for concern that the majority of the species is doomed to a type of uasi literacy evocative of a sort of technical writingMomento dystopia I believe the humanities oriented among us recognize this as the age old debate of will versus consciousness with will triumphant at lastBut all is not lost Carr concedes that there will always be a reading class of elites dedicated to the preservation of critical thought I for one am overjoyed at the prospect For too long have I toiled in the shadows of the robber barons of crass materialism skulkingly camouflaged as a bourgeois suburbanite Brothers and sisters rejoice The time of the Romantic Renaissance is at hand Fit me for something along the lines of a philosopher king and seat me on my Kurtz like throne fashioned from the skulls of MBA graduatesThere can be only one

  8. says:

    Here's an inference exercise Take the first half of Nicholas Carr's title THE SHALLOWS WHAT THE INTERNET IS DOING TO OUR BRAINS and guess what his thesis is based on the second half Got it? Good Cause you got it good when it comes to your addiction to the Internet Probably you wake up and wonder what's in your e mail's inbox Probably you check it before breakfast Probably even though you're not supposed to you peek at it from work Probably you're part of some social network site like Facebook or Goodreads and feel you are a player a valued member a person to be missed if you go missing for a week no worry there so you log on and interact Probably you're pretty witty too You can tell because lots of your friends whom you haven't met ROTFL and LOL at your witticisms Yes you take time to eat but probably you're wondering how your last witticism or your last thread started or your last photo uploaded has gone over You wonder for instance how many likes it has garnered or maybe how many hits your page has taken or maybe how many frienduests you have accumulated popularity if it doesn't work in THAT world certainly seems to in THIS oneThis is important stuff Thus the time suck and your total acceptance of that inhaling sound Probably you could be reading but it's fun to talk about your reading or your not reading or your should be reading or the concept of reading Probably you should be with your family but what the hell they're IM ing or texting or chatting on the cellphone or cruising the Net too Send them an e mail in the other roomBoy this is sad But not really because the Internet giveth and the Internet taketh away You being no fool focus on the giveth The Internet is a world of wonders a vault of information and facts easily accessible in lightning like fashion And you're pretty good at it by now too so all is not lostSo why wade THE SHALLOWS? Why let Carr rain on your parade with his own facts his own list of studies showing that the Internet is not the be all after all but might well be the end all? Why heed his relentless proofs that the Internet is little than the Great Interrupter that the Internet fractures our focus and muddies our mindsets that hyperlinks distract than enhance as we research electronically vs in an old fashioned book? Why pay attention when you know you're not very good at it any because the Net has taught your mind to lose focus uickly if it isn't fed uickly? Sound? Bite please Sight? Blink please Gratification? Instant pleaseWorship at the Church of Google as Carr calls it? Prepare for some blasphemy Carr will show you who Google's really looking after hint it starts with a G There's a little history here a lot of studies here than a few surveys statistics and data here but Carr pretty much keeps it in layman's terms He doesn't think the backlash against the Net will necessarily come from Middle Aged Grouches like me either In fact he suspects it will be the hopeful counter revolutionary young who will sound the clarion call for moderation and modesty when it comes to our electronic lives also known as our kidnapped real world lives the late great one you might recall that had a dream of SOME sort when you were young a dream now cannibalized by that doppelganger in the mirror OK screen reflection Virtual YouWell you could read it shrug and ignore it You could read it frown and dismiss it Or you could give it some thought roll up your sleeves and set to work on the recovery of YOU a person you might remember A person who once knew life without a cellphone without an Internet without an iAnything and was perfectly happy and complete despite that impossible to fathom handicapSurely you remember that rather uaint idealistic person Right? Whatever Before taking the long and winding road back might as well check e mail one time just once Like the White Rabbit people are waiting and they don't have all day Not any

  9. says:

    Regular review Summary Nicholas Carr discusses how much the internet is affecting our daily life in this book Four concepts I learned from this book 1 How books have changed this world? As people grow accustomed to writing down their thoughts and reading the thoughts that others had written down they become less dependent on the contents of their own memory Individual memory became less of a socially determined construct and the foundation of a distinctive perspective and personality Inspired by the books people began to see themselves as the authors of their own memories 2 How difficult is it to focus on one single thing in this world of continuous distractions? based on the author’s experience of writing this book It wasn’t an easy task for the author to write this book When he began writing this book he struggled in vain to keep his mind fixed on the job The net provided as always a bounty of useful information and research tools But its constant interruptions scattered his thoughts and words He tended to write in disconnected spurts The same way he wrote while blogging It was clear that significant changes were needed He moved the next summer with his wife from a highly connected Suburb of Boston to the mountains of Colorado There was no cell phone connection in their new home and the internet arrived through a ‘relatively pokey’ DSL connection He canceled his Twitter account put his Facebook membership on hiatus and mothballed his blog He shut downed his RSS reader and curtailed from Skyping and instant messaging He throttled back his email application and kept it closed much of the day The dismantling of his online life was needed for writing this book Being self employed he was able to do that without much difficulty but most people today who are employed today won’t be able to do that The web is essential for their work and their social life that even if they want to escape the network they could not 3How our thoughts cause a physical reaction and change in our brain with the help of Transcranial magnetic stimulation? An experiment conducted by Pascual Leone provides remarkable evidence about how the patterns of our thoughts affect our brain's anatomy He recruited people who had no experience playing piano and taught them to play a simple melody He then split them into two groups He had the members of one group practice the melody on a keyboard for two hours a day over the next five days He had the other group members sit in front of the keyboard imagining playing the song without touching the keys Using TMS's techniue Pascual Leone mapped the brain activity of everyone before during and after playing the songs He noticed that the people who had only imagined playing the notes exhibited precisely the same changes in their brains as those who had actually pressed the keys Their brains had changed in response to the actions in the brain purely on imagination This shows how our thoughts cause a physical reaction in our brains 4Why even Nietzsche and TS Elliot were not able to escape from the distractions caused by the technology? The type of bond we form with our tools goes in both ways Even as our technologies become extensions of ourselves we become an extension of our technologies When the carpenter takes his hammer into his hands he can use his hands to do only what a hammer can do The hand becomes an implement for pounding and pulling nails When the soldier puts his binoculars to his eyes he can see only what the lenses allow him to see His field of view lengthens but he becomes blind to what is nearby Nietzsche's experience with his typewriter provides a particularly good illustration of how technologies exert its influence on us Only did the philosopher come to imagine that his writing was thin; he also sensed that he was becoming a thing like it that is typewriter was shaping his thoughts TS Elliot had a similar experience when he changed writing his poems and essays to type them My favourite three lines from this book My favorite line in this book is the author's interpretation of 2001 A Space Odyssey a 1968 science fiction film by Stanley Kubrick “In the world of 2001 people have become so machine like that the most human character turns out to be a machine That is the essence of Kubrick’s dark prophecy As we come to rely on computers to mediate our understanding of our world it is our own intelligence that flattens into artificial intelligence”“Research continues to show that people who read linear text comprehend remember and learn than those who read text peppered with links” “What we’re experiencing is in a metaphorical sense a reversal of the early trajectory of civilization we are evolving from being cultivators of personal knowledge to being hunters and gatherers in the electronic data forest” Verdict 45The author depicted the advantages and disadvantages of the internet revolution and how Artificial intelligence can both be a savior and destroyer of our future This book will be a great pick for those who are interested in Science and Philosophy

  10. says:

    I wrote this because I was so jolly irritated to read what Pinker had to say about itAbout five years ago I began to be concerned that I was suffering early onset dementia My concentration span was almost zero Things I couldn’t do included putting on dinner and remembering I’d done that or following a whole page of Calvin and Hobbes panels I could no longer play bridge properly I certainly couldn’t read a book I couldn’t listen properly to anything people said and certainly couldn’t remember what I had ‘listened’ toComing across an article about ‘interruption science’ I realised that my problems emanated from how I was working and also playing At the time I was doing a lot of work which involved keying something into a search engine and having to wait about 20 seconds for a result Long enough not to want to wait not long enough to do anything else properly I’d flick to other sites read a sentence put a bid on ebaya comment on a blogand flick back again My life consisted of 20 second 1 minute bursts of ‘concentration’ flicking backwards and forwards to and fro This had such a profound impact on my brain that it was simply no longer able to function properly The effect on my bridge was stunning As a good bridge player I should be able to recall after a session all the bids and plays that took place during it Now I couldn’t even remember them from one second to the next It was devastatingrest here

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