review Joyful Wisdom Embracing Change and Finding Freedom 103

Yongey Mingyur ↠ 3 free download

?From the 2500 year old perspective of Buddhism” Yongey Mingyur writes “every chapter in human history could be described as an ‘age of anxiety’ The anxiety we feel now has been part of the human condition for centuries” So what do we do? Escape or succumb? Both routes inevitably lead to complications and problems in our lives “Buddhism” he says “offers a third option We can look directly at the disturbing emotions and other problems we experience in our lives as stepping stones to freedom Instead of rejecting them or sur I gave it 5 stars because this book sparked so many conversations Some tough and complicated ones I thought this book was kind of self help book but it turned out to be ‘very Buddhis’ It’s About the concept of buddhist teachings such as mindfulness and how to practice meditation It’s very interesting for meI might not be able to undestand it fully now i really need to reread it again but i got many ideas I think that what makes a good book さくら荘のペットな彼女 9 routes inevitably lead to complications and problems in our lives “Buddhism” he says “offers a third option We can look directly at the disturbing emotions and other problems we experience in our lives as stepping stones to freedom Instead of The Art of Not Breathing rejecting them or sur I gave it 5 stars because this book sparked so many conversations Some tough and complicated ones I thought this book was kind of self help book but it turned out to be ‘very Buddhis’ It’s About the concept of buddhist teachings such as mindfulness and how to practice meditation It’s very interesting for meI might not be able to undestand it fully now i As Bees in Honey Drown really need to Historic Hahns Peak reread it again but i got many ideas I think that what makes a good book

characters Joyful Wisdom Embracing Change and Finding Freedom

Joyful Wisdom Embracing Change and Finding Freedom

Yongey Mingyur is one of the most celebrated among the new generation of Tibetan meditation masters whose teachings have touched people of all faiths around the world His first book The Joy of Living was a New York Times bestseller hailed as “compelling readable and informed” Buddhadharma and praised by Richard Gere Lou Reed and Julian Schnabel for its clarity wit and uniue insight into the relationship between science and BuddhismHis new book Joyful Wisdom addresses the timely and timeless problem of anxiety in our everyday lives ? Kind introduction to many key concepts and practices in Buddhist mindfulness meditation eg Four Noble Truths awareness insight empathyAs the author succinctly puts it at the end of the book “joyful wisdom comes down to choosing between the discomfort of becoming aware of your mental afflictions and the discomfort of being ruled by them” p 268 Sam the Plumber readable and informed” Buddhadharma and praised by Richard Gere Lou Reed and Julian Schnabel for its clarity wit and uniue insight into the Naughty Bedtime Stories (Naughty Bedtime Series Book 2) relationship between science and BuddhismHis new book Joyful Wisdom addresses the timely and timeless problem of anxiety in our everyday lives ? Kind introduction to many key concepts and practices in Buddhist mindfulness meditation eg Four Noble Truths awareness insight empathyAs the author succinctly puts it at the end of the book “joyful wisdom comes down to choosing between the discomfort of becoming aware of your mental afflictions and the discomfort of being Grandmother Moon ruled by them” p 268

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Rendering to them we can befriend them working through them to reach an enduring authentic experience of our inherent wisdom confidence clarity and joy”Divided into three parts like a traditional Buddhist text Joyful Wisdom identifies the sources of our unease describes methods of meditation that enable us to transform our experience into deeper insight and applies these methods to common emotional physical and personal problems The result is a work at once wise anecdotal funny informed and graced with the author’s irresistible charm a must readit is impossible to prevent change from happening but it is possible to prepare yourself an extremely nurturing book


10 thoughts on “Joyful Wisdom Embracing Change and Finding Freedom

  1. says:

    It is wisdom to embrace change We should not block distractions or give in to them Instead I should welcome them as friends Hello fear Hello itch How are you? Why don't you stick around a while so we can get to know each other? This practice of welcoming thoughts emotions and sensations is commonly referred to as mindfulness drenpa in Tibetan language that is to become conscious Once I offer to make friends with my mind it's astonishing to discover how shy it soon becomes When I no longer resist a powerful emotion like fear I am free to channel that energy in a constructive direction When I hire problems as my bodyguard allied with me not against me they show me how powerful my mind is Their very fierceness will make me aware of how strong I am The reason behind the anxiety is not the problem I might be having because in reality the problem is not the problem but the real problem is the thoughts I may be having about the problem It is my perspective the way I choose to look at my situation Troubles sufferings offer an opportunity to discover a vivid sense of peace clarity and compassion The problem is the solution Simply stay with the situation look at it directly This allows a bit of space to spontaneously open up around it allowing us to see it as an endless ocean in which experience is nothing than one among a series of waves now rising now falling never separate from a limitless expanse


  2. says:

    The first book about Buddhism I would recommend is The Art of Happiness by the Dalai Lama The second book is this one The author explains how to apply Buddhist philosophy to the human problems we all deal with on a daily basis He shows how different methods of meditation can be used to get through common problems like self doubt and frustration with work He clearly explains step by step methods and illustrates his points with stories anyone can relate to He is good at explaining Buddhist terminology and I liked how he acknowledged that it is natural for beginners to become bored with the practices or confused with the theories I will definitely keep this on my iPod because the book contains information than I can remember from one reading I listened to this audio book a second time and I also bought a print copy to use as a reference book


  3. says:

    Kind introduction to many key concepts and practices in Buddhist mindfulness meditation eg Four Noble Truths awareness insight empathyAs the author succinctly puts it at the end of the book “joyful wisdom comes down to choosing between the discomfort of becoming aware of your mental afflictions and the discomfort of being ruled by them” p 268


  4. says:

    It's kind of random how I came across this book I had never heard of it before in spite of its best seller status I know I've hinted before that I'm going through some big things in my personal life so I'm sure this genre of book makes sense in that respect but the biggest thing that lead me to this book is that my husband has really gotten into Buddhism lately and I wanted to be able to keep up with him so I searched my library catalog for Buddhism and perused the selection I narrowed things down to what audiobooks were available realistically I am driving so much that audiobooks are my best option to read right now and this was first on the list that looked good to me I'm glad to report that this blind picking method worked out well this time Joyful Wisdom is what I like to summarize loosely as a practical guide to Buddhist meditation The author is a monk from Nepal who travels around the world and teaches these basics The book is broken down into 3 main sections Principles Experience and Application He covers the basic thought and history behind Buddhism first moving onto what those basics mean in your own life and then tells you how to apply these teachings to benefit your life He uses examples not only from ancient Buddhist texts and teachings but also from some of his modern students and what these specific techniues did for them In the application section he literally breaks down how to meditate on a specific Buddhist principle with instructions such as Assume the 7 point position Clear your thoughts and think about a person who you feel gratitude for Don't ponder on it for than a few minutes Very practical Very precise He even talks about how it's ok and even needed to take breaks and how even if we feel like we are failing because we can't clear our mind that's actually a good thing Basically there is no failure a nice notion to go into things with reallyI have always been the type of person who was interested in meditation but I just never found any explanations that made sense to me as to how to go about it I'm not one who easily relates to metaphysical speak like make friends with your fears Seriously? What? How does one do that? The greatest thing I gained from this book is an explanation of the meditation process that actually made sense to me It was also wonderful to learn that I am not alone or unprepared for this practice in fact most people feel similar to me when they can't get their head clear enough to focus on what they think they should It's about clearing other thoughts out of the way so that you can focus on what surfaces during that clarity If that thought bubbles up to the top obviously it is at the forefront of your mind and needs your attention I've never had such a rational sounding break down of meditation before I fully believe that anyone who is interested in meditation whether you've tried it and felt like you couldn't do it or if you're like me and have never fully tried because it never made sense this book is what you need There is so much information in here that I'm sure it would help even a seasoned meditatorI'm sure there is plenty that I could say about this book but just know that I give this book 4 out of 5 stars


  5. says:

    I adored this book and am buying my own copy I listened to this one on audio and the author uses one word repeatedly that he pronounced in an odd fashion and I just desperately wanted to make notes in the book as I was listening so I am looking forward to sitting down with my own hard copy I could seriously just copy the entire book here aas good uotes but I am just going to add the ones most profound to meIf you have a little water in ear pour in water and drain it all out A illustration of the ancient Buddhist principle of using the problem as the anecdoteWhen we become fixed in our perceptions we lose our ability to fly killing butterflies The butterflies that are mounted and displayed are not really even butterflies any longer since they cannot fly 3 poisons ignorance label on the bottle of hot sauce is the hot sauce desire for things to bring pleasure aversion the pushing away of things that bring unpleasantnessI can choose how to think about myself and all the stuff happening around me I consider myself very fortunate in fact Some people aren't capable of choosing and some people don't recognize that they can choose I guess I'm lucky because I fall in the category of people who are able to recognize their capacity for choiceWe must find the courage to be just as we are right here right now with all our doubts and uncertaintiesStory of the soldier with the poisoned arrow in his body Wait Before you pull out the arrow I need to know All of his ridiculous uestions By the time the doctor learned the answer to everything the soldier was dead This is an example of self created suffering the kind of intellectual overlay that inhibits us from dealing with painful situations simply and directly The moral of the story is to let go if the search for reasons blame or stories and simply look at the experience directly Extract the poison arrow of pain right now and ask uestions later or even never Once the arrow is removed the uestions are irrelevantCultivate lovingkindnesscompassionMeditation isn't something separate from your life it is your lifeWhen we  take the time to look at the way we see things the way we see things changesSelf awareness is a neutral mode that maintains self reflectiveness even in the midst of turbulent emotions Daniel Goldman Emotional IntelligenceEvery techniue of Buddhist meditation ultimately generates compassion Whenever you look at your mind you can't help but recognize your similarity to those around you When you see your own desire to be happy you can't avoid seeing the same desire in others And when you look clearly at your own fear anger or aversion you can't help but see that everyone around you feels the same fear anger and aversion This is wisdom not in the sense of book learning but in the awakening of the heart the recognition of our connection to others and the road to joy


  6. says:

    I gave it 5 stars because this book sparked so many conversations Some tough and complicated ones I thought this book was kind of self help book but it turned out to be ‘very Buddhis’ It’s About the concept of buddhist teachings such as mindfulness and how to practice meditation It’s very interesting for meI might not be able to undestand it fully now i really need to reread it again but i got many ideas I think that what makes a good book


  7. says:

    A really great book shows us how everything is great and worth to die for


  8. says:

    a must readit is impossible to prevent change from happening but it is possible to prepare yourself an extremely nurturing book


  9. says:

    Very relatable and has some good life advice even if you are not interested in religion


  10. says:

    It's been a long time since I have read a book on Buddhism and it was overdue It's nice to get some perspective on modern day living from time to time I had previously read a book by his holiness the Dali Lama and I felt that I had a strong sense of what each of the four Noble Truths of Buddhism were after finishing his book This book wasn't as concrete on what they were I couldn't decide if that was a good or bad thing The very fact that the author is vague than the Dali Lama makes you think about what exactly each noble truth is In some ways that is a very good thing The first noble truth is that the nature of life is suffering There is to it than that but that is the essence of the thing The other truths are a bit vague You would have to read the book to probably put it in your own terms I found myself looking up Tibetan or Sanskrit words that I was not 100% clear on After I finished the book I noticed a glossary at the back and read that also I noticed several definitions of words that I had looked up online were not the same definitions as I found in the back of the book I think many things were slightly different compared to my previous experiences reading up on this topic My assumption is that some of this is language barrier However there is an English co author named Eric Swanson for this book so it can't all be the language I still think you get the essence of the tenets of Tibetan Buddhism and if you are somewhat like me and think you have some small understanding of what they may be already this book may force you to look at what you think you already know in a different light It's all about perspective The final thing I wish to share about my experience reading this book is how it may have effected my personal life at the time without me even knowing it I was about halfway through the book when I became involved in a disagreement with someone I know via text message This person had no idea what I was reading but at some point in the conversation sent me an angry text that said Fuck you and your fortune cookie wisdom This bothered me for about twenty minutes but after awhile I found the response rather amusing A part of me wished that I could have said that to someone A great response That could be a line in a movie I can't tell you that I resolved this issue uickly The person in uestion remained angry at me for weeks because of what I said to them I think it is safe to say that I have a long way to go to reach my own Buddha nature However I do not regret expressing my thoughts and feelings honestly and can't deny that to get a response like that from someone this book must have had some effect on my day to day life I would like to believe a positive one however trying to prove you have wisdom by listing an example of someone telling you to fuck off is not wise Or is it? Meditate on that


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