(KINDLE) The Children Act Author Ian McEwan


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  1. says: review The Children Act read & download ´ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ß Ian McEwan Ian McEwan ß 7 download

    (KINDLE) The Children Act Author Ian McEwan read & download ´ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ß Ian McEwan Do you like to people watch?You know what I mean just sit somewhere in a busy place and watch people bustle past in all their colourful weirdness It's a habit I've acuired with age Sometimes I think back to being a teenager and remember how I always wondered if I was strange in some way I guess a lot of teens wonder that same uest

  2. says: (KINDLE) The Children Act Author Ian McEwan

    read & download ´ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ß Ian McEwan (KINDLE) The Children Act Author Ian McEwan Ian McEwan ß 7 download I have to stop reading McEwan's books because I never enjoy them There's something clinical removed about the way he tells his stories I don't get the sense that he likes human beings and he is writing about them to display his proficiency with structure and nuance rather than out of interest or sympathy This is probably a three star book but

  3. says: (KINDLE) The Children Act Author Ian McEwan read & download ´ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ß Ian McEwan review The Children Act

    (KINDLE) The Children Act Author Ian McEwan FILM adaptation now out in UK US and elsewhere I've appended a reviewcomparison of that to this review of the book“ She felt shrunken to a geometrical point of anxious purpose ” This was my eighth McEwan I rated On Che

  4. says: review The Children Act (KINDLE) The Children Act Author Ian McEwan

    (KINDLE) The Children Act Author Ian McEwan THE CHILDREN ACT is about the law and sensational cases but it is not a legal thriller Rather it is a beautiful and sad story of a High Court Judge forced to choose literally between life and death Her ruling though proper and legally sound leads to both

  5. says: read & download ´ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ß Ian McEwan (KINDLE) The Children Act Author Ian McEwan Ian McEwan ß 7 download

    (KINDLE) The Children Act Author Ian McEwan Ian McEwan ß 7 download From the first page I realized Ian McEwan’s The Children Act would conuer me This novel is a character study than a simple courtroom drama as it deals with marriage religion and life choices The story centers on the family court Judge Fiona Maye as she faces a crisis in her marriage uestions her life choices and stumbles practically on the edge of both her personal and professional life Her judgment must be ready for

  6. says: review The Children Act Ian McEwan ß 7 download (KINDLE) The Children Act Author Ian McEwan

    review The Children Act (KINDLE) The Children Act Author Ian McEwan I’m embarrassed to say that before The Children Act I was a McEwan virgin But now I’ve turned into a McEwan slut anxious to read his earlier books I can’t help myself What a great writerThis is the story of Fiona a highly respected judge who presides over family court She has to make hard decisions that determine the fate of families

  7. says: read & download ´ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ß Ian McEwan Ian McEwan ß 7 download review The Children Act

    review The Children Act (KINDLE) The Children Act Author Ian McEwan The Children Act by Ian McEwan My seventh McEwan Enduring Love Nutshell Amsterdam Saturday On Chesil Beach and AtonementThis one strikes me as a bit different from the others – almost like a “legal thriller” akin to a John Grisham although I don’t mean to imply that Grisham’s popular writing style is like McEwa

  8. says: Ian McEwan ß 7 download read & download ´ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ß Ian McEwan review The Children Act

    review The Children Act read & download ´ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ß Ian McEwan Ian McEwan ß 7 download You could argue that the character at the heart of this novel is dangerously close to being a misogynistic cliché the career woman who deep freezes her feelings in order to succeed professionally Fiona Maye is a High Cour

  9. says: (KINDLE) The Children Act Author Ian McEwan

    (KINDLE) The Children Act Author Ian McEwan Ian McEwan ß 7 download read & download ´ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ß Ian McEwan Perhaps it’s best I read The Children Act in the space of a day curled on my sofa Otherwise I might have been spied in my favorit

  10. says: (KINDLE) The Children Act Author Ian McEwan Ian McEwan ß 7 download

    (KINDLE) The Children Act Author Ian McEwan Don’t let the fact that this is a pretty short novel deceive you into thinking that there is not much substance here When I finished reading this book I couldn’t stop thinking about the enormous power that Family Court judges have over the lives of so many young children whose families are in crisis and then even if the decision seems right what happens to these children afterwards? Fiona Maye a High Court Judge in

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It SoundsThe many 4 and 5 reviews attest the merits of the book Also for all that I thought the ending was far too easy it was preferable to the one I feared was coming around the two thirds markOverall a 2 experience of what is objectively at least a 3 book I ve rounded up because I ve enjoyed most of his others And because of the music MusicA friend observed that many of McEwan s works feature music I hadn t really noticed that before but here it s impossible to miss I like that aspect The varying moods and situations of the characters are reflected in what music they listen to and perform The periods where music is not mentioned are at least as significant Music is integral to Fiona and Jack s relationship from the start He thought he might further seduce her with jazz He wanted to prise her loose from the tyranny of strict notation and long dead genius Music relieves stress Playing to her inner ear a piece she had learned by heart It was her ideal self she heard the pianist she could never become Music is in the weather Over the drumming of raindrops on her umbrella she heard the lilting andante walking pace a rare marking in Bach a beautiful carefree air over a strolling bass her own steps falling in with the unearthly light hearted melody Music is part of Fiona s brief errant youth when she was a groupie who dated the lead singer of a band Music is performance and a step into a different persona or world The horizonless hyperspace of music making beyond time and purpose Music is a means of communication Fiona once learned a jazz piece his taste than hers as a birthday gift to Jack Music is a means of avoiding communication She could not bear to hear herself explain her situation and make it irreversibly real In a spirit of defiance she played through her Bach partita Ultimately music is a metaphor Her childlessness was a fugue in itself a flight from her proper destiny There s a whole essay in the last three words of that uote The fact that Adam opts to learn the violin shortly before he s expected to die is pertinent but its power is diluted by McEwan hamfistedly spelling it out as an act of hope it implied a future lest readers fail to noticeIs this Really McEwanI associate McEwan with dark currents and darker undercurrents but if they were here I somehow missed them other than the general shadows of child welfare and near cultish religion to the extent that if I d not nown the author I d have been likely to guess Picoult than McEwan That may not be fair as I ve only read one Picoult and that was eight years ago but I certainly wouldn t have guessed McEwan I suppose his trademark brutality is there but of a very different and self imposed indThe pacing is also a little odd the first 130 pages takes place over a couple of days the remaining 83 pages race through several monthsIt s extraordinary how different this is in every respect from another McEwan portrait of a dysfunctional marriage On Chesil Beach reviewed HERE uotes Couples in long marriages aspire to the condition of siblings She preferred an imperfect existence to the risk of leaping into the unknown If he stayed humiliation if he left the abyss The worm of suspicion infected her past The silence between them expanded Remembering treats These offerings representing only a tiny fraction of the happiness she urged on him There must be a price for leaving her and here it was to be in exile a supplicant to his previous life She would not permit him the luxury of two addresses Waking up with a cold part of the bed to her left a form of amputation They both new the vitality of the unsaid What was reuired now was a row Stepped daintily around each other They were terse and competitively polite distracted by raw awareness of the other s radioactive presence He spoke to her with an awkward delicacy They ept away from the subject that might have destroyed them She belonged to the law as some women had once been brides of Christ The law at its worst not an ass but a snake The confident voice of a man who took his own competence for granted well used to giving orders Not men who ran the world but who made it run A shiny new hospital with shops and a business centre around a fountain The model was the modern airport With altered destinations and signs with motorway lettering Update Real life case similar to the secondary one in this storyAugust 2016 and The Independent reports Ultra Orthodox Jews launch million pound fundraising bid to stop children living with irreligious parents after divorceFilm Adaptation 2018Ian McEwan as screenwriter of his own works has been busy in recent months First On Chesil Beach see my review of book and film here and now this i and film HERE and now this I the film of The Children Act than the book which is unusual but likely to apply to books I ve been disappointed with or dislikedAlthough the novel is not long some streamlining was necessary On screen the story is almost entirely Fiona Adam s fate and the conseuences of that Her other cases are mentioned only briefly That s fineJack and Fiona s failing marriage is relegated to a backdrop Although I thought it too dominant a storyline in the book by reducing it so much the parallels and conflicts between the two relationships are not really explored Nevertheless McEwan between the two relationships are not really explored Nevertheless McEwan t alter the whole premise of the book by tagging on an incongruous postscript as he did for Chesil Music features strongly as in the book it sounds as good as it looks But Fiona and Jack s musical differences are not mentioned at all Another small lossRegardless of that nitpicking the casting and acting is superb most obviously Emma Thompson as the luminous earnest agonised Fiona and Fionn Whitehead as thoughtful passionate ethereal Adam Whitehead is definitely an actor to watch out for in future Jason Watkins is subtly excellent as the not uite comic assistant to M lady and Stanley Tucci play Jack perfectly More details on imdb HERE You could argue that the character at the heart of this novel is dangerously close to being a misogynistic clich the career woman who deep freezes her feelings in order to succeed professionally Fiona Maye is a High Court judge in her late fifties At the beginning of the novel her husband maddened by his wife s sexual detachment leaves to embark on an affair with a much younger woman It s easy to forget every judge has a personal life and that her professional life will have repercussions on her private life and vice versa On any given day during any given case who nows what private torments the judge is undergoing and which may easily affect her judgement McEwan examines what happens when the closed door between the professional and private swings open The case she has to try after her husband s defection involves a 17 year old boy who has leukemia and reuires immediate treatment but he has been brought up as a Jehovah s Witness and the religion forbids the transfusion of blood His family and the hospital are thus at loggerheads To be honest there s never much doubt on whose side Fiona will come out as McEwan one of the most doggedly rational novelists out there has a hard job concealing his scorn for Jehovah s Witnesses despite protesting otherwise with a passage like this Religions moral systems her own included were like peaks in a dense mountain range seen from a great distance none obviously higher important truer than another We all though love a good court drama and this was easily the most compelling part of the novel However once the court case is decided the novel fell flat on its face for me There s very little if any lived life in this novel The novel rarely comes alive as anything but a succession of ideas tailored together into a ind of fable And everything that happens after the sentence felt wooden and forced The subplot involving Fiona and her husband always seemed like an underpainting and never really acuired body At times implausible so much left unsaid that it was like watching two people with the sound turned off It s a short novel but even so it felt padded out with a lot of unnecessary detail In fact the I think about it the critical and disappointed I become Poor show from the man who wrote Atonement From the first page I realized Ian McEwan s The Children Act would conuer me This novel is a character study than a simple courtroom drama as it deals with marriage religion and life choices The story centers on the family court Judge Fiona Maye as she fac I have to stop reading McEwan s books because I never enjoy them There s something clinical removed about the way he tells his stories I don t get the sense that he likes human beings and he is writing about them to display his proficiency with structure and nuance rather than out of interest or sympathy This is probably a three star book but a two star experience. N erba diciassette anni e nove mesi troppo pochi per decidere autonomamente della propria vita o della propria morte Adam è affetto da una forma aggressiva di leucemia che richiede trattamento immediato I genitori del ragazzo e il minore stesso Testimoni di Geova si oppongono alla trasfusione di sangue che lo salverebbe Del suo futuro deve decidere la corte il giudice Maye che in deroga all'ortodossia sceglie di stabilire un contatto diretto E incontrando il ragazzo reale che si cela dietro il nome Adam Henry scopre un essere sul ciglio dell'abisso e però sorprendentemente appassionato della vita. .
Don t let the fact that this is a pretty short novel deceive you into thinking that there is not much substance here When I finished reading this book I couldn t stop thinking about the enormous power that Family Court judges have over the lives of so many young children whose families are in crisis and then even if the decision seems right what happens to these children afterwards Fiona Maye a High Court Judge in the Family Division of the Courts in England and this could be anywhere has had to make many decisions in the course of her career that impact the lives of children We learn of some of the thought provoking cases that she has ruled on a custody battle over two Jewish sisters whose divorcing parents are at odds over whether or not their daughters should be brought up in the strict orthodox Jewish tradition the case of conjoined twins and whether to save one or let them both die I was completely fascinated with the description of the laws and then the reasoning behind her decisions Although I felt that her decisions were clear and reasonable the important thing was that they really seemed to be looking out for the best interest of the children The case that is at the heart of this novel involves 17 year old Adam Henry who has leukemia and his Jehovah Witness parents refuse to allow him a blood transfusion that will save his life Adam s story and Fiona s ultimate decision the relationship that they develop and what happens to Adam captivated my attention such that I couldn t put this book downFiona herself is going through a crisis in her marriage and has some decisions to make about herself and her own life Whether she believes it or not the court decisions have affected her life and her marriage I have to admit that I was not shocked at the ending but none the less impacted by it This is a must read for anyone who appreciates the intelligent cohesive writing of Ian McEwan The Children Act by Ian McEwan My seventh McEwan Enduring Love Nutshell Amsterdam Saturday On Chesil Beach and AtonementThis one strikes me as a bit different from the others almost like a legal thriller akin to a John Grisham although I don t mean to imply that Grisham s popular writing style is like McEwan s literary styleThe main character is a woman at the peak of her career as a British family court judge she is called My Lady In the acknowledgements the author cites his research on the subject and those who helped him She deals with issues such as a dispute between a devout Jewish husband and wife where the husband does not want further education for their two daughters but the wife wants them to get a liberal college education Or child custody cases some spirited away to North African countries Adding to the pressure of her decisions the London newspapers often carry news of the cases and her rulings Some decisions involve life and death such as Siamese twins that will both die unless the weaker one is sacrificed for the stronger The main story involves a young man just shy of 18 who will die because he is refusing a blood transfusion for leukemia due his religious beliefs as a Jehovah s Witness view spoiler She rules that he can be forced to have the transfusion and the boy initially recovers But after she interviews him in the hospital he falls in love with her and stalks her Eventually the case results in tragedy hide spoiler THE CHILDREN ACT is about the law and sensational cases but it is not a legal thriller Rather it is a beautiful and sad story of a High Court Judge forced to choose literally between life and death Her ruling though proper and legally sound leads to both Do you like to people watchYou now what I mean just sit somewhere in a busy place and watch people bustle past in all their colourful weirdness It s a habit I ve acuired with age Sometimes I think back to being a teenager and remember how I always wondered if I was strange in some way I guess a lot of teens wonder that same uestion am I normal I wonder had I taken the time to people watch back then if I would have felt so lost and strange I don t see how I could have People are all damn weird creatures and they re really not very good at hiding itI m saying this because The Children Act feels like people watching Some books are easy to sell to other readers because I can promise you dragons and magic heart stopping action and romance that will steal your heart straight from your chest This is not that ind of book It s not even easy to put into words what this book is about But it was for me nothing short of fascinatingThe main plot follows the life of an aging judge called Fiona whose husband has just announced that he wants to have one last passionate love affair with a younger woman before they can both settle into old age He seems to believe she will be okay and accept the situation because of his openness and honesty He is not surprisingly wrongI guess this book is what people tend to call a character study but that sounds so boring Right Like Something You D Be Set For A College Like something you d be set for a college leave until the last minute and rush out in a mediocre essay possibly while drunk It isn t Fiona s tale may be a uiet journey through the inner workings of someone s life job and marriage but it is also an extremely interesting portrait of a woman who continues to go through the motions of her everyday life while her private life may be falling apart Fiona and the reader finds herself emotionally pulled inside the case of a boy who is a Jehovah s Witness and wants to be allowed to refuse medical treatment Because he is a few months shy of eighteen Fiona must rule whether he should be allowed to refuse the blood transfusion or whether the hospital can ignore his wishes and proceed to save his life I don t now how to convince others that this book is interesting I have to admit that I would not have picked it up without having read the author s previous work It s such a simplistic uiet story that is transformed into a powerful tale in McEwan s hands I have absolutely nothing in common with Fiona but her thoughts emotions doubts and insecurities feel extremely relatableThere are some authors that create stories which feel very personal and particular but simultaneously feel completely universal For me this was one of those rarities I am so glad I took a chance on this book and got to immerse myself in Fiona s lifeBlog Facebook Twitter Instagram Tumblr Perhaps it s best I read The Children Act in the space of a day curled on my sofa Otherwise I might have been spied in my favorite cafe purring like a contented cat stroked by the sublimity of Ian McEwan s prose Words adore Ian McEwan submitting readily to his firm but empathetic hand They are sleek and gorgeous dancers to his choreography alone the words are admirable but under his direction they assume nuance and strength His works never fail to take my breath away It is a comfort to now regardless of the story I am about to witness that I will be treated with the utmost respect by an author who assumes I revere language and composition as much as he does It is because of writers like Ian McEwan that I have come to cherish the art of writingBut even the most skilled and erudite writing cannot save a flawed story Fortunately this author takes his craft as seriously as his art In the vein of Saturday The Children Act imposes an ethical dilemma on a member of the elite caste of British society and places its protagonist in crisis In this most recent of McEwan s thirteen novels Fiona Maye a High Court judge in Britain s Family Division hears a case of a young Jehovah s Witness with leukemia whose parents refuse to allow a critical medical procedure His religion forbids blood transfusions and the hospital has appealed to the High Court to force the treatment on the dying patient Time is running out Fiona or My Lady as she is addressed in court has only a few days to hear the case and render her decision before it is too late to save the young man s lifeComplicating an already impossible situation is Adam the patient He is nearly the age of consent just a few months shy of his eighteenth birthday and his objection to the transfusion is as strong as his parents There is legal precedent to allowing a older minor to make life or death decisions about his care and the judge must decide if Adam is fully aware of the conseuences of his choice His death will be agonizing or in the unlikely event he lives his future will be a half life spent in blindness and compromised mental capacity Standing against her is a sheltered faith of dubious theological framework and the right to determine one s own destiny The control and confidence with which Fiona Maye handles her cases to determine one s own destiny The control and confidence with which Fiona Maye handles her cases the mess of her life at home At the start of this slim novel her husband Jack a university professor announces he wo. «Divino distacco diabolica perspicacia» così si mormora negli ambienti giudiziari londinesi a proposito di Fiona Maye giudice dell'Alta Corte britannica in servizio presso la litigiosa Sezione Famiglia Sposata da trentacinue anni con lo stesso uomo e senza figli il giudice Maye ha dedicato tutta la sua carriera alla composizione di dissidi sanguinosi spesso giocati nella carne di chi un tempo si è amato Battaglie feroci per l'affidamento di figli non più condivisi baruffe patrimoniali esplosioni d'irrazionalità cui il giudice Maye oppone un paziente esercizio di misura e sobrietà nella convi.

Ian McEwan ß 7 download

Uld like to have an affair and hopes she ll understand his need to assert his sexuality in the waning light of his life Fiona and Jack have been married for thirty years and although they have no children their life is enriched with the freuent presence of nieces and nephews McEwan brings to the page a paradox that fascinates me how many can be in such supreme command of their professional lives yet find themselves mired in disaster at home But this is where The Children Act stumbles and strains for me Jack offers as defense for the necessity of his fling the fact that he and Fiona have not had sex for seven weeks and one day a period during which Fiona was trying an exceptionally draining and emotional case As she ruminates about their marriage Fiona recalls an active and passionate sex life As sensitive and starkly real a portrayal of new marriage as McEwan rendered in On Chesil Beach I found myself disbelieving the mature marriage in The Children Act I couldn t determine if the author expects us to believe a man would pursue an affair after a brief dry season and that he would want his wife to accept to an open marriage a marriage that had heretofore nown great sex But later as Fiona and Jack find their way back to each other the tiny tender moments of frail solidarity seep in and mostly redeem the incredulous bitsThe troubled marriage plays in the background It is the case of Adam and his faith that allows us to enter Fiona s intellect and to battle with our own ethical and moral demons Fiona s internalized anguish over her own childlessness adds poignancy to her strength on the bench of family court She determines the fate of so many children yet Fate has determined that she will have none of her own In this era of doorstop novels those giant bloated affairs that become the darlings of the literati and of me yes I have loved many a 500 hundred plus pager in recent months it is a gift to read a rich complete thoughtful novel that combines meticulous research with exciting imagination in a mere 221 pages The Children Act isn t perfect and what a relief that it isn t right But it s vital full of emotion and so beautifully written it made me purr I m embarrassed to say that before The Children Act I was a McEwan virgin But now I ve turned into a McEwan slut anxious to read his earlier books I can t help myself What a great writerThis is the story of Fiona a highly respected judge who presides over family court She has to make hard decisions that determine the fate of families She doesn t seem to uestion her power or choices until her husband rocks her world and wants her to approve his plan to have an affair Fiona the ever rational and confident decision maker suddenly has to examine her life and uestion what she is doing now and what she should do in the futureThe book starts with Fiona and her husband having a restrained argument though underneath the cool fa ade Fiona is steaming She s passive aggressive and she doesn t communicate her feelings Her husband acts like a jackassI was immediately drawn into their lives and was pissed when the next chapter plopped me down in the courthouse Thankfully it didn t take long before I got sucked into Fiona s life as a judge But even though her professional life was intriguing I suddenly found myself reading about interesting cases that were leading nowhere I was left wandering around the courthouse in search of a plot thread to hold on to For me the book lost focus at that point No doubt McEwan wanted to give us a flavor of the moral issues Fiona faced every day but I wanted to get to the plot line already Luckily I didn t have to wander around for very longThe case that has Fiona all stirred up involves 17 year old cancer stricken Adam a Jehovah s Witness who is refusing a life saving transfusion The book goes back and forth between Adam s case and her broken relationship with hubby Both stories are good though the Adam story gets air time and is way compellingFor most of her adult life Fiona has not been an emotional creature and we watch as she struggles with uncomfortable feelings and a big moral crisis Perhaps for the first time in her life she experiences intense anger embarrassment longing denial and remorse What makes this book great is the sophisticated language which flows easily The writing is nuanced and understated and there s a lot going on between the lines It s straightforward yet complex Really it s beautiful prose It s obvious that McEwan loves language and he s so deft at manipulating words and constructing a compelling story it s not even funny Here s a sample She inferred from his evasive but morose remarks that in the statistician s bedroom he had not passed through the gates of paradise Where I really said Wow was when a uiet little incident took place It happened in the blink of an eye and it caught me off guard and gave me a jolt The incident was small and weird but WAS PIVOTAL TO THE STORY THE SCENE ITSELF AND pivotal to the story The scene itself and way McEwan slowly led up to it plus the element of surprise which McEwan teased us with were so masterful it made me shake my head in happy wonderBesides the random court cases that were thrown at me at the beginning of The Book Text That Took book text that took precious space in this compact novel there s a too long concert scene at the end I m sure McEwan meant it as a build up to the finale but it was distracting and boring and I just wanted to get out my red pencil and delete big chunks of it So yes there were two cases where an editor could have done some judicious chopping but otherwise the book is nice and tightThis is a short book with a big impact It left me wondering what I would have done in Fiona s shoes We learn along with Fiona that there are no simple answers and that our actions can have huge conseuences for others This is a thought provoking insightful and beautiful character study of a complex woman As I said I m off to check out McEwan s earlier books I m a book slut and I m proud of itNEWS FLASH September 2018Grab some popcorn The movie version The Children Act comes to theaters on September 14 The wonderful Emma Thompson plays the lead The trailer is fantastic I m chomping at the bit FILM adaptation now out in UK US and elsewhere I ve appended a reviewcomparison of that to this review of the book She felt shrunken to a geometrical point of anxious purpose This was my eighth McEwan I rated On Chesil Beach as 5 five others as 4 and Black Dogs as 2 That track record gave me high hopes for The Children Act raised further by the intriguing dilemma at its heart whether a bright and articulate Jehovah s Witness boy very nearly 18 should be forced to have a life saving blood transfusion against his religious based wishes and those of his parentsI was disappointed Disappointed BecausePart of the reason was a mismatch of expectations which is no fault of McEwan s Although the dilemma about Adam is important the erratically beating heart of the novel is the marriage of Fiona the judge and Jack an academic The tasteful opulence of their home life and careers is established on the first page and the cracks in their longstanding marriage are exposed on the second She s 59 in the infancy of old age he s a year older They never uite got round to having children of their own their sex life has diminished and Jack is restless but honest and not entirely plausible Nevertheless the most incisive and poignant writing relates to Fiona and Jack s relationship The various court cases including the headline one which isn t the only one where a strict and insular religion is a child welfare issue are echoes analogies and catalysts of that core dynamic I didn t find them especially insightful in part because much of it seemed trite sentimental and predictable The dilemma which I was expecting to be the cream of the book was like semi skimmed milk The legal points were carefully explained and finely balanced but mostly familiar to anyone who s read about such cases in the news These passages had of the feel of a text book or debate than paragraphs of a novel despite McEwan s exploring the corresponding emotional conseuences Two Realms CrossThere is painful irony of Fiona protecting families while failing to create her own and of her sorting out other people s relationships to the detriment of her own Where was her protective judge She has devoted her adult life to the application of man made law and the laws of classical music Adam has committed his life to obeying the Jehovah s Witness interpretation of God s law Jack doesn t defer to a similar external authority maybe that contributes to his crisis and ultimatumAs Fiona and Jack drift she becomes increasingly involved in Adam s case possibly exacerbating the situation with Jack Or maybe the fractured marriage frees her or even sends her deeper into her work Better than. Nzione di «poter restituire ragionevolezza a situazioni senza speranza» I casi su cui è chiamata a pronunciarsi popolano i giorni e ossessionano le notti di Fiona calcandone la coscienza Forse la rendono più sfuggente distratta Sarà dunue a uesto che si deve l'oltraggiosa richiesta di suo marito Jack «Ho bisogno di una bella storia passionale» un «ultimo giro» extraconiugale con la ventottenne Melanie esperta di statistica Umiliata ferita «abbandonata agli albori della vecchiaia» Fiona cerca rifugio come d'abitudine nel caso successivo È uello di Adam Henry violinista dilettante poeta
The Children Act